Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,971   Posts: 1,558,639   Online: 997
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Göteborg, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    558
    Images
    4
    "There are no photographs while I'm reloading" - Garry Winogrand

    Ha! Love it. Strangely, it's the same for me! ;-)

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    53

    Developer's role in dry-plate tintype

    There is a small section in the book of Alternative Photographic Processes:
    http://www.amazon.com/Book-Alternati...e=UTF8&s=books

    But it is very small.

    The book basically says the dry plate process can be done with any liquide emulsion, on any dark backing. The catch is: the developer has to have a small amount of exhausted fixer in it (no actual amount given, to quote the book: "this isn't an exact science"). The hypothesis is that the high silver content from the exhausted fixer serves as an emulsion lightener.

    Hope that helps.

    Josh

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,566
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Talk to Calamity Jane about the Rockland stuff... it was a gross waste of money if I recall correctly. She may be able and willing to point you to something more viable.

    i have spoken with people who have used the rockland stuff too
    and they said just the opposite. there is a tintype studio at the smithsonian
    and rockland supplies all the materials for ambrotypes / tintypes there ..
    and from what i understand, john coffer got his start using the rockland
    tintype kits, and used them for years, before he settled down and began doing what he
    is currently doing.

    i just ordered a tintype kit to test the waters. from what i understand the layer
    of emulsion has to be a certain thickness, or they have a less than optimal experience.
    maybe calamity was not using the ag plus emulsion?
    while regular liquid light can be used instead of ag + , but unfortunately the liquid light
    is "runnier" and does not have as high a silver content as the ag +,
    the thicker emulsion ( from what i understand ) is easier to coat with , and
    the high silver content is something the developing agent needs and works best with it ..

    i will post again when i have some examples to show ...

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    2
    John Coffer once said words to the effect of the rockland kit was so awful it helped inspire him to crack the wetplate forumula which is way superior in so many ways.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Idaho USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    36
    Images
    3

    Collodion were not positives!

    I do collodion wet and dry plates all the time. The Tin-types and ambrotypes are basically nothing but under exposed negatives. Put a black background on them and the optical illusion appears positive. With the glass plate version you can hold it up to light and see it is a weak negative, hold it in front of a black surface and it is positive. The whole number on having to have some special reversal developer is a rip off. Done both process, and end up fully agreeing with John Coffer.

    I've done dry plates and screwed up on exposure and some have been very similar, weak negative but put against a black background, the same old positive. Intensified a few to experiment with for the fun of it, and they were the same on glass. Intend to try some dry tin types this late fall/winter when I do a lot of plates since the dry plates are perfect for winter weather.

    Years ago did some Rockland on home made plates as I had left over emulsion, and then since the kit didn't have excess developer left over, developed them in regular paper developer and they worked, some in D-76 I believe and they worked. My homemade plates were a joke, but the images where it wasn't streaked from brushing it on, was fine. Any liquid emulsion would behave the same, weak negative on black background will appear positive! Save a few, or more than a few bucks!

    J Truman

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    177
    I've been working on this for a few months. I have been using a homemade silver bromide emulsion similar to liquid light on glass. I've managed to make a passable ambrotype, but I'm not satisfied yet.

    So far I've been properly exposing my plates to be processed as an ambrotype. I've developed in PMK, stopped in water, and fixed in KCN. The KCN is by far the best fixer I've used. Whoever is using sodium thiosulfate or rapid fixer is lying to themselves about the worthiness of their fixers. The PMK is not an ideal developer at all. I'm currently waiting on my ferrous sulfate to arrive so I can make a classic ambrotype developer with it.

    Once I've got a satisfying ambrotype I plan on writing it up and sharing my experience.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,566
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Talk to Calamity Jane about the Rockland stuff... it was a gross waste of money if I recall correctly. She may be able and willing to point you to something more viable.
    it actually wasn't a gross waste of time, just the opposite ...
    she had bad developer, that rockland replaced
    and once she got her developer straightened out she did very well
    http://www.apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=128944
    she just went in a different direction afterwards and did hybrid / silver ..
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...raphy-business!
    ===

    its weird that there is bad press on this process. it is actually pretty easy ( and fun )
    and it works very well to make something just as "authentic" as the wet plate tintypes ...
    but without having to use collodion/ether and potassium cyanide.
    and it was made on black paper stock as well as glass and metal plates.
    http://notesonphotographs.org/index....rotype_Process
    it just takes melting the gelatin emulsion and running it on a CLEAN plate
    and then putting it on something flat+cold to set.

    and if its because it is sold as a "kit" ( like the collodion kits sold by b+s)
    than it is easy if someone wants to make their own emulsion and developer ...
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum229/...us-things.html
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum205/...errotypes.html

    others who are doing it

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshuablackwilkins/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/visualadventure/
    http://www.christopherschwer.com/www...e_Tintype.html
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/guyjbrown/

    its easy to put a small plate in a small camera too ..
    no large format is needed ... i've stuck a plate in a 35mm camera, a 120/box camera
    as well as larger ones ... as long as there is a bulb setting its easy ...
    Last edited by jnanian; 03-30-2013 at 11:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    it actually wasn't a gross waste of time, just the opposite ...
    she had bad developer
    [...]

    its weird that there is bad press on this process. it is actually pretty easy ( and fun )
    and it works very well to make something just as "authentic" as the wet plate tintypes ...
    Well this is encouraging news to hear. I've been pretty much our of the loop on everything for the past few years with family illnesses and work, but life is beginning t slow back down for me now and I'm looking at old interests I had rat holed away. And then this ancient thread pops up from the grave in my subscribed list.

    Weird.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,566
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    8
    hi michael

    making these tintypes is a piece of cake !
    you need to coat the plates / tins with a lot of emulsion, the process likes lots of emulsion.
    rate it at about iso 1 ..
    when the glass or metal plate develops it looks like it didn't work
    until you put it directly into the fixer, once it is the fixer it clears and gives a really nice image.
    its about as much effort and difficulty as shooting a paper negative

    have fun !
    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 04-06-2013 at 04:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin