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  1. #11
    Davec101's Avatar
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    One tip i heard the other day about using the sun to develop your cyanotype is that using direct sunlight you get less contrast in the print and you get more contrast on an overcast day.
    Have not tried it yet as i am one of those people with a UV lamp thingy
    Platinum Printing Editions http://www.dceditions.com
    The Art of Platinum Printing Blog http://artofplatinum.wordpress.com/
    Alternative Photographic Processes blog http://altphotoblog.com/

  2. #12

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    Well the exposure was 40mins in bright sun, i would assume it would be a few hours in an overcast day.

  3. #13
    Salmonoid's Avatar
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    I been making sun exposures recently and it seems that 40 minutes is much to long an exposure. I find that 6 minutes should be about max for bright sun. 40 minutes is hard to believe!

  4. #14
    roy
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    Well done. Are you pleased with it ?
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salmonoid View Post
    I been making sun exposures recently and it seems that 40 minutes is much to long an exposure. I find that 6 minutes should be about max for bright sun. 40 minutes is hard to believe!
    It depends on where you live. Vancouver is quite a bit North. 6 minutes is more like my experience for summer printing in open sun where I live. There are tables in almost all of the old (early 20th century and before) photo books that give sun-exposure time corrections for time of day and latitudes.

    EDIT:

    I can't locate one of those tables (I'm not at my library right now) but here is an interesting survey on Cyano printing times. Many variables are not described, like neg density, etc. but hte data is interesting in terms of ballpark exposure times. Fortunately location is always mentioned:
    http://www.alternativephotography.co...es/art068.html
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 09-27-2006 at 09:50 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: more info

  6. #16
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    Here in Sunny Florida, my exposures can be as short as 3 minutes in direct sun. Wonder what it's doing to my skin?!

    - Randy

  7. #17

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    yeah i saw that long exposure time and thought "where's he from?" mine are typically 4 to 6 minutes. but hey, vancouver's up by the north pole, isn't it? probably hardly any sun at all this time of year. one good thing about sunny southern california i guess.

  8. #18
    Ole
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    Anywhere from three minutes to three hours is my experience, from even farther north. All depending on time of year and haze levels and whatnot.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
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    Maybe it is overexposed somewhat.
    There are no white areas left in the photo.

    Or your original has not enough contrast if it looks to flat with less exposure time.

    yes, it's a very nice process to work with.
    enjoy it.

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