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  1. #11
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Robert,

    If you want to push it with Science Lab Chemicals, you could let them know you expect a full refund otherwise you will report them to the shipper for improperly shipping hazardous materials. If they're smart, they'll avoid the hassle and return the money you are owed.
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
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    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  2. #12
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    The original E1 stabilizer for Ektachrome was a packet of paraformaldehyde and a bottle of liquid containing Photo Flo.

    Mixing the two in hot water caused depolymerization of the paraformaldehyde. It is also know in the literature as trioxymethylene and polyoxymethylene.

    The solid is a relatively safe way to store formalin. I then place it in hot water to regenerate the formaldehyde. I keep a large bottle of Fischer Trioxymethylene on my darkroom shelf. It has served me for over 30 years.

    IMHO, your formalin is not bad, it just needs a thorough mix and then gentle heat.

    PE

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik View Post
    Robert,

    If you want to push it with Science Lab Chemicals, you could let them know you expect a full refund otherwise you will report them to the shipper for improperly shipping hazardous materials. If they're smart, they'll avoid the hassle and return the money you are owed.
    Kerik, That may be a good idea. I went and dug out the box and paper work to make sure I didn't miss anything. The formaldehyde was shipped without a hazardous materials shipping paper. It was shipped UPS ground and the only other identifying label is a small blue sticker that says "consumer commodity ORM-D"

  4. #14

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    Robert,

    Unless there is a lot of sediment, the reduction in solution percentage is probably of no importance for hardening gelatin. Rather than fight with the supplier, I would try it, and if it works fine, then don't bother.

    There's too many things in the world to get worked up over, and this one doesn't sound like a problem worthy of the hassle.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    They also didn't ship it Hazmat like they should.
    Whether something must have hazmat shipment depends on the substance and the amount. For example, one pound of sodium hydroxide (lye) does not required a permit while two pounds does. However, you can order as many pounds as you wish provided each pound is in its own package.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky View Post
    Robert,

    Unless there is a lot of sediment, the reduction in solution percentage is probably of no importance for hardening gelatin. Rather than fight with the supplier, I would try it, and if it works fine, then don't bother.

    There's too many things in the world to get worked up over, and this one doesn't sound like a problem worthy of the hassle.


    ---Michael
    Michael, You are probably right. It is not worth the hassle although I would like my money back. There is about an 1 1/2" of sediment in the bottom of a 1 liter bottle. Is this a lot? I don't know. I have nothing to compare it to because I've never seen this before and all the formaldehyde I have seen has been water clear. It is nice to get a lesson in polymerization but not at 60.00 a lesson. With that much sediment I'll just have my pharmacist order me some. I'll feel more comfortable using formaldehyde that I know is good. No sense in introducing any future problems into the process by using a chemical I'm not sure about. So I'll just chalk it up to experience. PE, I'm sure what you're saying is true. But I'm using such small amounts that a liter will last a very very long time. If I was using larger quanities then I may consider trying mixing and reheating. But even though I have a pretty good ventilated darkroom I wouldn't feel comfortable reheating formaldehyde with the family upstairs. The risk outweighs the costs. Thanks guys, Robert

  7. #17

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    Robert,

    Oh man, that does sound like an awful lot to me. At $60 a pop, it is a harsh lesson. If you paid with credit card, you could tell them you will dispute the charge if they don't refund your money since they sent defective product.

    I'll send you a PM with some info I found on formalin...


    --Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Mutmansky View Post
    I'll send you a PM with some info I found on formalin...
    Michael, can you post it here? I plan on using glyoxal for hardening because I print my first coat in a day or 2, but I will be using formalin when I don't have that luxery.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  9. #19
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    I use glyoxal. It works very well and does not evaporate a lot into the air so you can work with it without having a lot of heavy fumes in the lab.

    PE

  10. #20

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    I'll never use glyoxol again. Works fine if it is very fresh, but as the bottle ages, it causes the gelatin to yellow unacceptably, regardless of the time delay between sizing and printing the first layer.

    Jeremy, unless you can't adequately handle it, I would dispense with the glyoxol and go straight to the formalin. There are some sources out there for it, but I am not going to publicly point people to them as it is a chemical used in the grug trade (at least I've been told) and is a SOB to boot, so I don't want people to casually get their hands on it.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

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