Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,592   Posts: 1,546,030   Online: 970
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pakistan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    266
    I remember Liam Lawless has written an article on exactly this in the "World journal of post-factory photography", entitled something like "salt prints without salt". He noted, if i am correct, that it was particularly papers with alkaline buffers responding well to just coating them with silver nitrate together with an organic substance (he had some fancy recipies on this), and exposing them - he particularly recommended fabriano 4.

    I tried it once, it works, though I would have had to calibrate the process had I pursued it.

  2. #12
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    How does it come out with an image?

    I intend to pick up some silver nitrate when I get the chance so I can start playing around with these things.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    232
    some papers still contain alkaline buffers and often salts that may react with silver nitrate... You will still obtain a very unusual salt print.

    If successful you should have a (rather unpleasant, but tastes are tastes) brownish-purplish image.

    I would rather experiment on calotypes and investigate Hyppolite Bayard idea of "direct positive" which I heard of --(a sort of calotype positive taken in camera like it were a daguerrotype but with a paper base).

  4. #14
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    I remember reading about "paper daguerreotypes" somewhere.

    Here it is -

    There's a website
    http://www.classic-photography-schoo...reotypes.shtml

    that talks about that. AgBr on paper and developed with mercury.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    232
    mmm must be some sort of cross between daguerrotype and calotype

    I would stay away from mercury vapors

    I'm not sure if this is what Bayard process consisted of...

    Anyway I found this description on Wikipedia:


    << The direct positive process involved exposing silver chloride paper to light, which turned the paper completely black. It was then soaked in potassium iodide before being exposed in a camera. After the exposure, it was washed in a bath of hyposulfite of soda and dried. The resulting image was a unique photograph that could not be reproduced. Due to the paper's poor light sensitivity, an exposure of approximately twelve minutes was required. Using this method of photography, still subject matter, such as buildings, were favored. When used for photographing people, sitters were told to close their eyes so as to eliminate the eerie, "dead" quality produced due to blinking and moving one's eyes during such a long exposure. >>

  6. #16
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    Fulvio

    YES, OMG I saw that a loooong time ago and it caught my interest. I tried it with a piece of chlorobromide paper, darkened in the sun, and them soaked in iodine tincture. I put it out in the sun with a dark card on one half for around 25 minutes, and then put it in fixer. I saw a LITTLE difference between the two halves, but it could've just been my head.

    As I recall, he was going to announce this right before the daguerrotype can out, yes?

    Wow, thank you sooo much for reminding me about that.

    Do you have the stuff to try this??

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    232
    yes, Bayard didn't make it to become the "founder" of photography in France, but actually he played a significant role. He was the first one to held a photographic exhibition and arguably creator of both the first staged photograph and the first political protest photograph ever.

    The whole story here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolyte_Bayard

    As for me, I didn't try the direct positive, but in the last months I've been playing with Talbot calotype negatives a lot.

  8. #18
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    Did you ever get the calotype negatives working? I know you were posting here with alot of troubles with them.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Italy
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242 View Post
    Did you ever get the calotype negatives working? I know you were posting here with alot of troubles with them.
    yeah, they're quite difficult to perform... Paper selection is crucial, among other things.

    there are several methods to make calotypes

    I haven't been successful with Talbot original process, but there are some easier variants. This process will always deliver unpredictable results.

    The most recent I made were a few weeks ago for a demonstration... One looked fine, another like total crap, same day same setting... Calotypes require a lot of light to print, arguably much more than collodion wet plates. Shooting indoors can be very difficult, sometimes close to impossible (also because they're sensitive only to UV and a little to blue-violet light). If you shoot outdoors you need a portable darkroom as they have to be exposed wet. There's a way to make them dry-sensitized, but they're even slower.

    If one wants to have fun with a very rough paper negative, I suggest to use modern liquid emulsion on lightweight paper (<100gsm). The effect is close enough and easier to handle. You can develop the "negative" with a brush or a sponge to achieve a more painterly effect on the final print.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pakistan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    266
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulvio View Post
    yeah, they're quite difficult to perform... Paper selection is crucial, among other things.

    there are several methods to make calotypes
    Have you tried the instructions in Alan Greee's "primitive photography"?

    I didn't (yet), but they seem to be congruent with older literature (silver sunbeam), and they describe also the dry paper process.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin