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  1. #11

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    thanks buze and jordan!

    guillaume: reduction, at least as i did it using potassium ferricyanide and hypo, did not appear to change the color at all. it simply cleared the highlights.

    no it's not harmful to re-wet the print. in fact it's recommended! give it a try if you need to.

    2 minutes huh? so perhaps that explains why my 30 minute humidification ended up with the paper floating in the water, with the tape glue having given way. thanks.

  2. #12
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    Back to th4e original question.

    Humidity is everything. I used to dry with a hair dryer and then hold the coated paper over a small electric skillet with water just below boiling for a few seconds until the paper became slightly limp. This worked rather well, but was not really efficient.

    I now have a humidifier set to 50%. The paper to be coated stays in the room with the humidifier overnight. After coating, the paper is dried in a drying cabinet without heat for ten minutes and then exposed.

    My printing is now very consistent, and easily repeatable at any time.

    I don't like t obleach , and so I never do so.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Back to th4e original question.

    Humidity is everything. I used to dry with a hair dryer and then hold the coated paper over a small electric skillet with water just below boiling for a few seconds until the paper became slightly limp. This worked rather well, but was not really efficient.
    With all of the iron processes humidity is very important.

    I personally believe that reduction by bleaching is a totally unnecessary step. If one develops the print in an acidic water solution, and then goes directly to noble metal toning followed by a short fix in a very dilute solution, the result will be very good Dmax and clear whites. I treat VDB just like kallitype and get very similar results

    Of course, choice of paper is highly important in the iron processes. If in doubt, just find out what papers works well for pt./pd. and they almost certainly will also work with kallitype and VDB.

    Sandy

  4. #14

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    thanks jim and sandy.

    funny, i've never had problems with kallitype and dmax, and i always let the paper dry overnight (so it's VERY dry). same with cyanotype. that's why this vandyke thing has thrown me for a loop...wasn't expecting a humidity issue!

    which presents certain problems for me. not sure how i can reliably regulate the paper's humidity on the cheap (i don't earn any money off this, so i can't afford fancy equipment).

    what i did learn tonight is what happens when it's not dry enough. :/ the paper felt dry after a pass with the hair dryer, but there were spots where it was still damp, and those spots look awful. however they mostly missed my CharThrob step tablet area, so i think i can get a usable curve off them. if the curve is similar to the one i did a couple of days ago (which was slightly overexposed), i'll call it done and actually try a print.

    what i've got to do now is work out a methodology for keeping the paper just damp enough. i'm thinking i'll coat it, let it dry for an hour, coat again, dry with a hair dryer until it feels right, then let it hang for ten minutes just to make sure.

    this is gonna screw up my kallitype procedure now, i can just feel it...

    p.s. paper by the way is stonehenge rising, which seems to work pretty well.

  5. #15

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    oh one more thing...is it more important to have the paper at the right humidity before i coat, or when i'm actually printing? i.e. can the sensitizer be what moistens a previously bone-dry paper?

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by rippo View Post

    this is gonna screw up my kallitype procedure now, i can just feel it...

    p.s. paper by the way is stonehenge rising, which seems to work pretty well.

    This should not screw up your kallitype procedures. All of the conditions that are favorable for kallitype and pt/pd work in the same direction for VDB. Those conditions are, 1) a good paper, 2) relatively high humidity in the work room (i.e. 60% or higher best), and 3) if #2 is in doubt, expose and develop the sensitized paper as soon as it is dry to the touch.

    Sandy King

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rippo View Post
    oh one more thing...is it more important to have the paper at the right humidity before i coat, or when i'm actually printing? i.e. can the sensitizer be what moistens a previously bone-dry paper?
    Yes, for best and most consistent results it is important toi have the paper at the optimum humidity before coating. And keep it at that humidty through exposure and until you begin processing.


    Sandy

  8. #18

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    just so you all know there's a happy ending....



  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by rippo View Post
    just so you all know there's a happy ending....


    Congratulations. Looks like you have real good Dmax and nice clear highlights in that print.

    Seems to have a lot of grain, though. Is that from the negative? Or am I just seeing things?

    Sandy

  10. #20

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    thanks sandy.

    it's not the film, it's the printing. here's the original photoshop file (scanned from film and tweaked). it's not nearly as grainy. any idea what would cause that in the printing process? perhaps not quite dry enough?


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