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  1. #1

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    Platinum toned silver prints?

    A "curiosity" question. I am quite familiar with several toning methods but what happens when silver prints are toned in platinum (or palladium) ? I don't think I've seen this done before and I wonder why?

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    Kerik's Avatar
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    Centennial printing out paper is a silver paper that is commonly platinum or palladium toned. Nice stuff...
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Grenier View Post
    A "curiosity" question. I am quite familiar with several toning methods but what happens when silver prints are toned in platinum (or palladium) ? I don't think I've seen this done before and I wonder why?
    Cost I imagine. Toning with gold, platinum and pallaidum is more expensive than selenium and sulfide toning. When you tone a silver print with gold, platinum or palladium there is a reaction by which the nobel metal replaces most of the silver.

    Toning silver prints with gold, palladium and platinum was very common practice in 19th century.

    Sandy King

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Cost I imagine. Toning with gold, platinum and pallaidum is more expensive than selenium and sulfide toning. When you tone a silver print with gold, platinum or palladium there is a reaction by which the nobel metal replaces most of the silver.

    Toning silver prints with gold, palladium and platinum was very common practice in 19th century.

    Sandy King
    Thanks, Sandy, Kerik.

    More speciafically, what happens to a platinum-toned silver print in terms of color. Would it be somewhat along the lines of a true platinum print? I would also assume that a palladium-toned silver print would be warmer in color then ?

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    Not to hijack too much, but I actually have a similar question. That is, the blue toning kits (like Berg blue) use some of the same chemistry as cyanotype kits. For people who have used both, do the blue-toned silver prints seem to approximate the tonality and color of true cyanotypes?
    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    Not to hijack too much, but I actually have a similar question. That is, the blue toning kits (like Berg blue) use some of the same chemistry as cyanotype kits. For people who have used both, do the blue-toned silver prints seem to approximate the tonality and color of true cyanotypes?
    No.
    Don Bryant

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    Not to hijack too much, but I actually have a similar question. That is, the blue toning kits (like Berg blue) use some of the same chemistry as cyanotype kits. For people who have used both, do the blue-toned silver prints seem to approximate the tonality and color of true cyanotypes?
    To expand on Don's quick answer -

    cyanotypes tend to be high contrast, with the texture of the paper substrate a major element of the final image.

    Prints toned in iron-blue toners usually have longer, smoother tonality, and retain the surface texture of traditional gelatin-silver papers. They tend to be a darker blue, almost a cool blue-black, and in some instances the blue tone bleeds into the highlights. More importantly, the iron-blue toning process is not archival.
    Louie

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    I realize that it's not archival, but certainly some cyanotypes with similar iron salts have been around and in good condition for a century or longer. I have one really nice iron-blue toned print that is displayed under UV-proof museum glass and not exposed to direct sunlight -- should I have any reason to think that it will fall apart any faster than a standard silver print?
    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    I realize that it's not archival, but certainly some cyanotypes with similar iron salts have been around and in good condition for a century or longer. I have one really nice iron-blue toned print that is displayed under UV-proof museum glass and not exposed to direct sunlight -- should I have any reason to think that it will fall apart any faster than a standard silver print?
    True cyanotypes are among the most archival of all types of photographic prints.

    Sandy

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    Sandy, if I'm not mistaken, isn't iron-blue toning nearly the same chemistry as cyanotypes? I thought the iron-blue toners were also potassium ferricyanide / ferric ammonium citrate based processes. As with cyanotypes, ferric ferrocyanide (aka Prussian blue) is the salt that produces the color. I understand that its aesthetic characteristics may differ as a UV-dependent contact process versus a toning process, but I don't understand why it should be any less archival than a cyanotype.

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Blue/blue.html
    Last edited by DrPablo; 03-14-2007 at 01:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Paul

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