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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Richard;

    It is Photo Flo 200 concentrate. The 600 can be used, but you should use a lot less.

    Bruce;

    See the Photographers Formulary for pictures and prices, you can also see my posts here on APUG.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Liquid light is too thick for an easy even coat. If you heat the plate befor coating the emulsion will start to cool the plate and still get uneven. The best thing is to heat the plate from the under side after pouring off the extra emulsion and move it around to coat it evenly.

  3. #13
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    Kevin has a good point. Using the plate coating method will work well with a heated plate and by pouring on the Liquid Light. In that case, if it is too thick you could dilute it with a small amount of Everclear (95% ethyl alcohol with no denaturing agents).

    PE

  4. #14

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    I'll try the plate warming idea. It makes sense the emulsion congeals as soon as it hits the cool metal, I expect to see a big difference. If not, I will have proven to myself that I should just wait until the collodion workshop I'll be attending in a couple of weeks.

  5. #15
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    If the stuff is anywhere near similar to wetplate collodion you should be able to pour a pancake-sized puddle of emulsion in the center of a horizontally-held plate and swiftly flow the emulsion by tilting the plate towards each corner, then up vertically to pour the excess off. There are several ways to hold the plate while doing this, but I prefer the "waiter tray" method.

    If the emulsion is too thick I would second the suggestion of diluting it with Everclear 190 proof grain alcohol.

    Quinn Jacobson has a You-Tube video in which he demonstrates the collodion technique:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gyf8fQOdvDs


    Joe

  6. #16

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    The printed circuit and chemical machining people often spin coat resist emulsions onto metal. The photo emulsion is thicker than KPR, but the technique may still work. For non-production work, you could put a hot plate in the bottom of a drum to keep the work area warm and then use an electric screwdriver to spin the work (at a fairly low speed). Some sort of a wire holder could be rigged to hold the plate. It is important to keep the plate fairly level during spinning in order to get an even coat.

  7. #17

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    PE, will those blades work for other processes like maybe Carbon or Albumen?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by magic823 View Post
    I've used a hvlp sprayer (same type used in woodworking) to spray liquid emulsion on canvas. Its the only way I've found to get an even coat.
    Hi,

    Could you please elaborate on the type of unit you use? I've seen a couple on ebay (units and "brushes" or whatever they're called). I'm actually looking at a nice reconditioned Wagner.

    Any help & tips would be appreciated.
    -
    Daniel

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by colivet View Post
    PE, will those blades work for other processes like maybe Carbon or Albumen?

    Yes, they work with other processes. Sandy King and I worked with and coated some carbon sheets last spring using one of his formulas.

    Just because it works, does not mean that it is optimum though. As Sandy pointed out, due to the thickness of the carbon required, other methods function just as well as the blade.

    PE

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Yes, they work with other processes. Sandy King and I worked with and coated some carbon sheets last spring using one of his formulas.

    Just because it works, does not mean that it is optimum though. As Sandy pointed out, due to the thickness of the carbon required, other methods function just as well as the blade.

    PE
    You can definitely use the blade to coat carbon tissue, though it would need modification to coat as thick as I like. And even with the modification I don't believe the blade would be *more* effective than my present system of coating carbon tissue, where I roll a heated tube or rod over the warm pigmented gelatin to even it out, with the final height determined by the thickenss of the flexible magentic sheeting frame which forms the borders.

    I have also used a threaded rod to coat carbon tissue, and a rod might work with some of the coating procedures being discussed. Check out this source for threaded rods and other types of coating devices. http://www.rdspecialties.com/Page.asp?Script=1

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 03-28-2007 at 11:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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