Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,717   Posts: 1,514,808   Online: 829
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Akki14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    London, UK
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,872
    Images
    210

    Possibly silly idea about paper coating

    I'm about to try traditional cyanotype for the first time and I've been reading about glass coating rods and have bought a hake brush. I was just thinking, has anyone tried using a plastic straw as a coating rod? I figure the bendy part on one end would make a decent handle like the glass coating rods have but am not sure just how nonreactive plastic is to cyanotype nor if it has similar pushing and pulling properties.

    If you all think I'm mad, I'm willing to try it out on my own

  2. #2
    nicolai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    San Francisco, CA, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    190
    I have no idea, but I'm also interested in the answer!

  3. #3
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cary, North Carolina
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    808
    If you are not mad, will you still try it? 8)

    Try both and make your decision on which works best for you. The thing is about alternative processes, it's one big long science experiment which produces art.
    A New Project! Transformations 02/02/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  4. #4
    mmcclellan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan (USA)
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    463
    Isn't the real issue here having the rigidity that's needed to ensure a smooth and even coating? With plastic, it would seem to be impossible to maintain even pressure across the length of the straw so that some ares end up with thinner coating and others with thicker. Just a thought . . . .
    Michael McClellan
    Documentary Photographer
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    http://www.MichaelMcClellan.com

  5. #5
    Akki14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    London, UK
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,872
    Images
    210
    I thought that the point of coating rods is that it pulls the liquid across the paper? Are you suppose to be putting loads of pressure on a coating rod?

    I tried it on the watercolour paper i'm intending on experimenting on and, okay it was completely dried didn't try to steam it or anything, but it seemed to gather randomly so i was only pushing streaks so maybe not the best idea i've come up with. Probably just need practice though.

    I'm fairly mad, I'm sure I'll do it anyway as part of my experiments. I've already soaked two pieces of the watercolour paper in a 20g to 1litre filtered water solution as it was suppose to be acidfree paper but doesn't say if it's buffered or not. It's cheap storebrand stuff so I figured it might possibly not be buffered.

  6. #6
    davido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    toronto, ontario canada
    Shooter
    Holga
    Posts
    461
    Images
    17
    You need some amount of pressure to keep the 'device' in complete contact with the paper or the sensitizer won't be pushed along evenly. the weight of the glass rod is pretty much enough but a little bit of pressure has to be applied in my opinion (especially if you are making larger sized prints than say 4x5).
    If you are getting streaks, then you're not using enough sensitizer. It's good to practice with water/foodcoloring. I would try a somewhat decent paper like Stonehenge, which is reasonable and proven to work well with VDB's. At least then you narrow down a few variables.

    david

  7. #7
    davido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    toronto, ontario canada
    Shooter
    Holga
    Posts
    461
    Images
    17
    sorry, just remembered that you're doing Cyanotypes! oops! well, Stonehenge is still a decent paper. I'm sure it would do fine for Cynotypes too.

    david

  8. #8
    Monophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,691
    Images
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by davido View Post
    It's good to practice with water/foodcoloring. I would try a somewhat decent paper like Stonehenge, which is reasonable and proven to work well with VDB's. At least then you narrow down a few variables.
    david
    The Rising mill that manufactures Stonehenge paper has announced that they will be closing permanently in June.

    FWIW, I made a puddle pusher using a length of 1/2" plexiglass rod glued to a 1x2" scrap of 1/4" sheet plexiglass. Works just fine and was very inexpensive.
    Louie

  9. #9
    davido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    toronto, ontario canada
    Shooter
    Holga
    Posts
    461
    Images
    17
    oh s**t!! that's a real drag about Rising Mill closing. Stonehenge is really a great paper for the price.
    david

  10. #10
    bruce terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cape Fear NC
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    190
    Akki14 - You already know I suspect, that a RIGID puddle-pusher rod requires a leveled glass plate underneath too work in bulletproof mode.

    A brush is slightly more forgiving.

    If a straw, first pretest it in a hyper-thick chocolate milkshake - if it doesn't collapse sucking-up the first lump of ice cream it probably can shove around some whimpy chemicals before it disintegrates.

    :•/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin