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Thread: Stripping film

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    Stripping film

    I'm old enough to remember stripping film. That was a series of graphic arts films where the emulsion could be removed from the base and transferred to another support. It was used for lateral reversal of halftone negatives. I remember seeing an expert strip a 10X12 negative from a film base and transfer it to a glass plate. These materials were in declining use in the 50s and were discontinued in the 60s.

    Does anyone know anything about the structure of these films? In particular, how were they made so that the emulsion could be easily removed? I was thinking that some variation on this technique could be very useful in alternative process printing, especially for gum-like processes and carbon.

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    Fleixchrome film was one product as you describe. I used it to make a number of color prints.

    It was film support with unhardened gelatin on it. On top was laminated another thin film support and the regular emulsion was coated on top of that.

    After processing at 68 deg F, the film pack was heated to about 75 - 85 degrees F and the inter layer of gelatin melted allowing the two layers to separate. In Flexichrome, the emulsion bearing support was backed with a subbing that allowed it to be laminated to paper to make reflection prints, or the dye image imbibed in it could be transferred like matrix film.

    PE

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    In the late 1980s Bob Pace published a book on "The Art of Photo Composition" which is a how to book for doing strip ins. The books deals ith strip in for the dye transfer process as well as how to do them with C prints and the equipment, film and examples. It is about a hundred page book crammed with information.

    Regards
    Gord

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    Well, for that matter, it is possible to strip the top Resin (polyethylene) layer from RC paper along with the emulsion to get a 'film' of emulsion on PE. It can then be laid out on any surface you want.

    It is a messy process but I have seen some interesting work done this way.

    PE

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    Ron

    I used an Agfa stripping film in the 80's. Can you, in the near future provide the details for delaminating RC paper please. Is the finished look close to the excellent result obtained with the film?

    Many thanks
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

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    In the 80's I worked as a photo comp technician in the largest lab here in Toronto.
    One of the many jobs we would do is montage on 16x20 trans film multiple images that would then go off to the film stripping houses that would work with our output. These technicians would indeed cut and float the film and reassemble onto another support film for magazine work and such.
    We had a Lisle Camera which was an over head process camera with reflective lights on front and a Deveere 16x20 light head on back. We would blow the images through the lens to the back darkside which would hold with vacumn 16x20 transparancy film
    We would balance the reflective art and transparacies with filters so that they would work together.
    This Lisle camera was one of 2 or three made and the first version was driven by a computer with bubble memory and we had to pound the buttons in sequence to move the stepper motars to move the images together. We would use a thousands of an inch super gage to calculate the movements .
    Sometimes we would combine over 50 images onto one sheet of film using a very complicated series of masks that we would cut by hand using rubylith and Pos Neg lith film. I learned all I need to know about montaging in those years on the Lisle Camera, and it is really funny for me to see 20 years later all these tools in PS and driving my Lambda Unit. *Nothing Changes just the tools we use*
    I would be suprised to hear of anyone doing this anymore , but I am sure there are some oltimers lurking around that could describe the process precisely and you could easily do it today with a lot of patience and a steady hand and crisp eyes.
    Quote Originally Posted by gordrob View Post
    In the late 1980s Bob Pace published a book on "The Art of Photo Composition" which is a how to book for doing strip ins. The books deals ith strip in for the dye transfer process as well as how to do them with C prints and the equipment, film and examples. It is about a hundred page book crammed with information.

    Regards
    Gord

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    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    You will need a good pin registration system*the best I used was the Stroseer system, Lith film and chemicals, Rubylith, Vacumn Contact easel, consistent dev for the lith film, NuArc exposing vacumn system with pins.
    A very good light table,** this is the basics for Comp work**
    When visualizing the masks you must always make the most domanint image mask first , or better stated the image that sits on top of all other images* then you work your way down by making each secondary mask . Once you have made all the secondary masks you will end up making the final mask which is a combination of all the above masks.
    Once all the masks are perfect it is then a matter of putting the Images into the enlarger and positioning the projected image into its respective mask. you will need pin registration and vacumn at the easel side.
    The above description is a very basic overview of how to make a projected photomontage which I can say I have done over a thousand of.
    I will also say I will never make another one as the time, patience , headscratching,burning of the eyeballs throgh the loupes, that I endured learning this process was enough for a lifetime.
    *we use to make cigarette ads from scratch, and I mean from scratch. the only source was a piece of paper and we would cut and paste and use pantone colours to manufacture the cigarette package and the butts sticking out , and then put behind the package any sort of sexy image that would convince the public to buy the smokes.* this was very time consuming and boring to do
    If you want to cut and strip a few images with simple *Butt lines *then I would say go for it as it is totally feasable, and not knowing your end process, it may be totally possible with the right images the liquid to release the emulsion and the secondary overlay.



    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I'm old enough to remember stripping film. That was a series of graphic arts films where the emulsion could be removed from the base and transferred to another support. It was used for lateral reversal of halftone negatives. I remember seeing an expert strip a 10X12 negative from a film base and transfer it to a glass plate. These materials were in declining use in the 50s and were discontinued in the 60s.

    Does anyone know anything about the structure of these films? In particular, how were they made so that the emulsion could be easily removed? I was thinking that some variation on this technique could be very useful in alternative process printing, especially for gum-like processes and carbon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    Ron

    I used an Agfa stripping film in the 80's. Can you, in the near future provide the details for delaminating RC paper please. Is the finished look close to the excellent result obtained with the film?

    Many thanks
    Richard;

    No, the results are milky looking to me, at least that is my opinion of the ones I saw, as the stripping process affects the PE more than stripping 'rea' film did.

    The process involved a long soak in 85 deg F water or so, for hours, as you worked the PE-Emulsion away from the TiO2 and paper backing. In one hand you ended up with a limp emulsion - PE picture and in the other you ended up with the rest of the sandwich of TiO2, paper and the back supporting PE layer.

    The paper was floated in water and moved to the desired support and allowed to settle into place, and moved around gently with a finger.

    IMHO, it did not result in good pictures and often a lot of the white backing and paper stuck to it, or the picture and PE you stripped off tore.

    It can be done. I never tried it. I thought it was not worth the effort and result.

    PE



 

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