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  1. #11

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    I was just at a local large format users' meeting and got some good advice. Apparently I was using paper that wasn't sized properly so the sensitizers weren't adhering properly. Also had some paper recommendations (and local sources!) so this is good. Between that and the advice in this thread I should be in better shape next time.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  2. #12
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    I've tried watercolour paper, rising stonehenge paper, a low weight calligraphy paper, etc, and I've had nothing but problems with the stain leaching out during the rinse, water marks, image softness, etc.
    I just made over 200 or so cyanotypes with Rising Stonehenge and they appear to be OK. I dunno, I'll ask the 46 recipients of the recent postcard exchange to render their verdict.

    No staining, no leaching, no watermarks during rinsing. My image is purposely soft, so I can't comment there. I'll post a couple of my cyanotypes images soon. I liked the paper so much I ordered a whole bunch more.

    I also like the Fabiano and Aristico paper for PT/PD. I forget exactly which 'model' of paper. But they come in 8"x8" square pads. Works for me.

    Last year I also bought a dozen 20"x24" (I think that's the size) sheets of Arches Platine paper in Toronto. Wonderful stuff for PT/PD, but a pain the butt to cut. Well, I'm lazy that way.

    I haven't tried the Arches Postcard paper for PT/PD or cyanotypes. Might do that for the next postcard exchange round. Arches postcard has a very rough surface texture, so it might go so well. Dunno. They're great for Polaroid transfers though.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
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  3. #13

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    Actually looking back over my rising stonehenge attempts, I think the major problem was that I was using negatives that weren't suitable (not enough contrast), but the texture of the paper also gave me the impression that it was leaching off (because of the soft look). With my other "bad" papers (some type of watercolour & a calligraphy parchment) it was definitely leaching off, which confused issues as I coated several of each type and did a run of all of them. It's hard to sort things out with multiple variables flitting around like little bats and pestering you.

    I picked up some new paper (arches hot pressed watercolour) which a local VDB & Pt/Pd printer recommended, and it seems to have a good texture for fairly detailed prints, so I'll try it with a negative that I've had good alt. process prints from on crane kid finish.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  4. #14
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I second Kerik on the Weston. Overall the best paper I have found for use with a wide variety of alt process. Lighter weigh than many, but very good wet strength.
    You may be having problems other than paper also. What is the usual humidity range in your dark room? Is your tap water acidic or basic? These and other things sometimes neglected are important to good print quality.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  5. #15

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    I think the water is basic, which I guess would tend to bleach cyanotypes, right? There's no way I'm going to use distilled water for this stuff (would need way too much), but maybe I could add a pinch of some kind of buffer, or even just a bit of acid, to reduce the pH.

    The humidity here is very low.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  6. #16
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    Any word on any plans to produce a whiter version of the Weston paper?

  7. #17
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    Robert - Nope, not yet.
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  8. #18
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    I think the water is basic, which I guess would tend to bleach cyanotypes, right? There's no way I'm going to use distilled water for this stuff (would need way too much), but maybe I could add a pinch of some kind of buffer, or even just a bit of acid, to reduce the pH.

    The humidity here is very low.
    Yes, put a pinch of citric or boric acid in the wash out water, especially for the first 30 to 60 seconds.
    Also, you do need to raise the humidity or humidify the paper after drying the sensitizer. Before I bought a humidifier i used to hold the dried paper over a small electric skillet with water just below boiling for several seconds until it became slightly limp. This increased my success rate tremendously. It also improved the D-max of cyanotypes and VDB's.
    Good luck.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  9. #19
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    Walter, just add some vinegar. Acid seems to make the cyanotypes a bit more turquoise, but after it oxidizes (or after you add peroxide) that turquoise effect goes away. If your cyanotypes are looking on the purple side, they may be in an alkaline environment. That will not only bleach it, but it will make it fade over time. So when I intentionally bleach my cyanotypes, I follow that with a bath in acidic water to prevent unwanted bleaching from continuing.

    As for papers, I can't get enough of Bienfang calligraphy parchment for cyanotypes. I'll also use that for Van Dykes once I get that going. It's too thin for gum printing, though.
    Last edited by DrPablo; 05-09-2007 at 08:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Paul

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Also, you do need to raise the humidity or humidify the paper after drying the sensitizer.
    Interesting. I do it bone dry -- I worry that a little bit of moisture will cause the chemistry to develop itself while being exposed. With cyanotypes I just use multiple coatings to increase the Dmax. I use the old cyanotype process, and with 3 or 4 coatings it becomes almost black in the darkest shadows.
    Paul

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