Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,953   Posts: 1,522,752   Online: 990
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Hey Kerik since your tip I thought maybe the paper needed a stronger soak with oxalic acid, so I mixed up a batch of 4% OA, and soaked it. I got great result, beautiful smooth skies......

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51
    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (cjarvis @ Dec 11 2002, 10:33 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
    </td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Carl:

    I tried Lenox 100 with Zia and can NOT get that paper to work. I have nice, repeatable results with Cranes, but Lenox 100 seems to drink up the emulsion. Thoughts?

    I&#39;ve only done a little Zia on Lenox. What I found was higher than normal contrast with lower than normal speed (not a bad thing for zia, it makes the contrast similar to develop-out) with charcoal-black neutral color. How are you coating the Lenox? It likes lots of humidity and a long period of brushing. It might do badly coated in a dry room with a tube. 65-70% humidity seems ideal. You could also try an oxalic acid pre-treatment. I don&#39;t find Lenox *needs* this, but it might help if you&#39;re having coating problems. I&#39;ve found it is a bit more absorbent than, say, Platine, but just about in line with Cranes Cover in terms of drop counts. I&#39;ve done an enormous amount of develop-out printing on Lenox using this coating, and the few tests I tried with zia chemicals did just fine, noting as above the relatively low speed and high contrast.



  3. #23
    cjarvis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    183
    Images
    26
    Thanks for the tip, Carl. I&#39;ve tried rod and brush coating, but as you suspected, I started with relatively dry paper. I&#39;ll try pre-humidifying. I will say that I do like the paper for albumen. It doesn&#39;t have the tendency to curl that Crane&#39;s has (heavier weight), and the surface is really sweet.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51
    I understand the "real" purpose of Lenox is for intaglio printing where high absorbency and high loft are desired for lots of ink density and visible embossing from the plate. It seems to resist changes in humidity, that is, it takes longer to dry it or to humidify it, but when you find the right humidity level it is a wonderfully easy to handle, forgiving paper to work with in Pt/Pd. You may want to use a first clearing bath of citric acid (2-3%) and then EDTA/sulfite: without the acid clearing you *may* see a very slight overall yellowing of the entire sheet but this seems to fix it right up.


Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin