Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,581   Posts: 1,545,765   Online: 1067
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Argentina Buenos aires.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5
    After several tries, and lots of research, I contacted Jorge Gasteazoro on the Photo.net forum. He gave me more precise instructions and finally I got successful results.
    The following is a detailed explanation of the process.
    I start by mixing 3 egg whites (arround 80ml) with a solution of 20ml of distilled water and 2g of salt.
    I shake the mixture until I get a consistent foam.
    I let it sit for a week in the fridge. I take all the foam that rests in the suface of the liquid, and then I pour the solution into a bottle (trying to avoid bubbles). You have to keep the solution refrigerated as it´s organic!
    Then I double coat the paper (I use fabriano 100% cotton) by brushing slowly the solution (avoiding a harsh brush, as you´ll get bubbles in the surface) once, hanging it to dry, and coating it once again (I double coat to get a shinny surface, as the paper is too absorbent).
    When the albumen is dry, I´m ready to coat it with the silver nitrate solution (the same I use for Salt Printing).
    I tried coating by flotation (the traditional method) but it´s more complicated than what it seems to be.
    The result is very pleasing, and you get a lighter brownish (yellower) than with salt printing. Not as yellow as the 1860´s albumens I have. =)
    Thank you Jorge once again for the help on this process.

    Agustin Barrutia,
    Cinematography/Photography student,
    Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    132
    I just read The Albumen and Salted Paper book, which is on line at http://albumen.stanford.edu/library/monographs/reilly/. Congratulations on your success!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    My pleasure Agustin, but you promised you would upload the image, so give it up buddy....

  4. #4
    cjarvis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    183
    Images
    26
    That's an interesting formula. For even better results, try adding a dash of acetic acid to denature the solution, and to help preserve it, try adding an equal amount (to your salt) of sodium citrate. Try this:

    http://www.redhillphoto.com/albumen.html

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    23
    Thank you Agustin for your detailed report. I recently made a visit to my local art museum which featured a photo collection from the La Salle Bank of Chicago dating back to the 1850's. Several Pt./Pd. prints along with
    Albumen prints. I fell in love with the warm yellow tone of the Albumen.
    I was disappointed in the Pt./Pd. as I was waiting for that "magic" to reach out and grab me and it didn't happen!
    At one time I was set to take an Alternative Process workshop which included negative enlargement using what I believe then was Kodak SO132
    interneg film, which I understand is no longer available. Since it was being discontinued at the time, the instructor decided not to include negative enlargement as part of the class and thus I didn't take the workshop.
    In todays world, how are you making the enlarged negatives for contact printing? Going from 4X5 to 8X10 would be ideal for me! Please don't tell me I have to invest my lifes savings into a computer, programs, scanners, etc. to get a good contact negative!

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    129
    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Rick @ Jan 9 2003, 08:24 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>In todays world, how are you making the enlarged negatives for contact printing? Going from 4X5 to 8X10 would be ideal for me&#33; Please don&#39;t tell me I have to invest my lifes savings into a computer, programs, scanners, etc. to get a good contact negative&#33;</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    I have an 8x10 camera, and haven&#39;t tried this, but there is good info on how to do this.

    There&#39;s already a thread on this in the Contact Printing forum, called "Enlarged Negatives for Contact Printing".
    Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Rick, check out unblinkingeye (link on the home page). Ed has a couple of articles on enlarging negatives for alt printing. The one I like is the direct positive from ortho film, pretty cool idea.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Just north of the Inferno
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    750
    Images
    27
    On a related note....

    I&#39;ve been reading the on-line albumen book from the link provided as well as some other articles on the subject.

    One thing that struck me was the statement by some that you needed good quality eggs for the albumen. Ideally from free-range organic chickens.

    Does anyone have any experience with both standard store eggs and organic eggs? I&#39;m wondering if there is that much of a difference.

    In theory I can see this as being true. I have raised chickens before and the eggs you get from free-range organic hens do LOOK different. But I don&#39;t know if that affects the albumen.

    Also, off the wall question here. Anyone know of anyone who has used ostrich eggs as a source? There is an ostrich ranch not far from me which sells the infertile eggs. They have a LOT of albumen in them. Just wondering if anyone has used them and if there is any difference in quality.
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  9. #9
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    ..

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    There is a difference. One of my other hobbies is raising chickens and I can tell you that mine give richer eggs and darker yolks than you will find in any grocery store. They are also guaranteed to be much fresher. They have more flavor also, so you can have a hearty breakfast while preparing your printing papers.

    >One thing that struck me was the statement by some that you needed good quality eggs for the albumen. Ideally from free-range organic chickens.
    Does anyone have any experience with both standard store eggs and organic eggs? I&#39;m wondering if there is that much of a difference.<

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin