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  1. #1
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    Alternative color processes.

    I don't even know where to start looking on this one.
    If there's anything possible, I'd like to try some alternative color processes, besides RA-4 and Ciba.
    I don't know what there is or how terrifying the chemistry would be...
    Are there any old color processes worth trying out?
    Or does everything involving color mean mass produced paper and chemistry with big ol' machines and all that?

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    You can try making color separation negatives with black-and-white film and making carbon/carbro prints. They're VERY labor intensive, but they're also the most archival and permanent color prints you can make. You're supposed to do it with three colors, but it can be done with two. Look up Edwin Land's work on color printing for more information.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Multilayer gum prints are also beautiful and allow for a wide range of effects.

    Bromoil is another possibility.

    There are also easier processes that can also be interesting like hand coloring of B&W prints or Polaroid transfers and lifts.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4
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    I really like toning, including of lith prints, as a pseudo-color option. There are some phenomenal B&W prints that for all the world look like full color because of split toning effects. Lith printing is easy as can be as well, in fact it may even be easier than regular silver B&W printing.
    Paul

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoBBo View Post
    Or does everything involving color mean mass produced paper and chemistry with big ol' machines and all that?
    You can certainly do even conventional (C-41, E-6, RA-4, Ilfochrome) color processing yourself. Kodachrome (K-14) would be a challenge, though.

    In addition to the odd processes already mentioned, there are unusual things you can do with the standard processes. Cross-processing comes to mind -- running E-6 slide film through C-41 chemistry or vice-versa is one fairly popular oddball process. Another thing to try is RA-4 reversal processing: Expose RA-4 color paper, develop it in a conventional B&W paper developer (such as Dektol), expose it to light, and then run it through the conventional RA-4 process. You can use this process to create relatively normal-color prints from slides or negative images from conventionally-processed negatives. Images from slides tend to be high in contrast and colors can be a bit odd, but this works for some shots. Results vary greatly depending on the paper and B&W developer you use. I've also heard of people using RA-4 paper in large format cameras and processing it in this way to get prints directly. Another thing to try is printing slides on RA-4 paper and processing them normally to get a negative image.

  6. #6
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    I think Scott and David hit the nail on the head with what I'm looking for.
    I'll look into those processes.
    Thanks a ton guys.

  7. #7
    nze
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    Chris Nze
    me Apug Portfolio
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  8. #8

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    A specialist in the field is the French Henri Gaud. He does in-camera separations and has the ambition to create tricolor gums from it.

    At the time of writing, he is moslty scanning and joining.

    his site: http://photothequegaud.free.fr/trichromie/

    A good example of "gomme trichrome" by François Croizet is here: http://photothequegaud.free.fr/trich...ancois-croizet

    Greetings,
    G

  9. #9

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    More tricolor gum

    Don't forget Keith Taylor, the master of impeccably gorgeous tricolor gum printing, who prints for Cy deCosse. You can see the prints in the current show here:

    http://www.johnstevenson-gallery.com/gallery.html


    Katharine Thayer

  10. #10

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    Mastering gum printing is incredibly difficult. I've never attempt to make tri color gum prints, myself. I would expect it to take alot of work.

    I use gum for placing colors of my choice in certain areas of the image and for making color images that are not really color accurate.

    Is there a free source of information that describes getting good accurate tri color gum prints? When I was looking into it there was this guy who figured it out but he wouldn't tell anyone how to do it unless you paid him a couple grand or something. I can't remember his name, is it one of the links listed here?

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