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  1. #11

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    I've heard of using a drop of Linseed oil to soften up a tile of ink in order to do some feathering...and I'm sure there are special mediums available (besides that which is available from David lewis) which will do the job as well.

    - William Levitt

  2. #12

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    Sep 2002
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    As William said, linseed oil is recommended for softening. For hardening, you can add ground up pastel crayons or a drop of melted beeswax. Such information is available in the literature, such as the PSA site mentioned above.

  3. #13

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    I showed my oil pigment prints at the last meeting of the Austin Alternative Process Group, and several people in the group asked me to teach them what I know about the process. So, I have written up what I have learned in a brief article at http://unblinkingeye.com/AAPG/OP/op.html, which also contains jpegs of the two successful images I've made. Next month I will host a demonstration of the technique and try to help people get started with it.

  4. #14

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    Nov 2002
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    Thank you, Ed, for your informative article. I finally had the chance to try this over the weekend, and had a lot of fun in the process. I pretty much followed your instructions, except for a different dilution of sensitizer and I brush coated, and was able to come up with an ok print (I need more practice&#33.

    I used Fortezo DW FB grade 3, and simply brushed on a 5% ammonium dichromate solution after fixing and drying the paper. I can't really comment on exposure times, as it was partly overcast part of the time and I was able to get direct sunlight the rest of the time, I just judged when it looked like it received enough exposure. I'm using ink from the Graphic Chemical and Ink Company.

    Sensitizing the paper was a bit different from what I expected, though (as compared to other alt processes I've tried). Using a brush to spread the dichromate, if felt like the gelatin surface of the paper was getting sticky, and I did have some problem with some of the dichromate beading up (like water drops on a car that has just been waxed). It's hard to say whether this beading up affected anything or not (it seemed to all wash out after exposure) because I still need practice in inking the print. Next time, I think I'll try a little less dichromate solution to coat the paper, in hopes that it doesn't bead up.

    I was just wondering if you had this same problem of little droplets of sensitizer on your paper, and if you did anything about it. It could be that I just need to learn how to coat it a little better!
    Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public.

  5. #15

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    Sep 2002
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    Austin, Texas
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    I add a drop of 5% Tween-20 to 10 ml of sensitizer to improve the spreading properties. As I recall, I'm using about 1.5 ml to coat an 8x10 sheet of paper using a rod. I use a hake brush for 11x14--wet it with some distilled water first and shake it out. The Tween-20 will prevent the sensitizer from beading up.

  6. #16

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    Sep 2002
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    Austin, Texas
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    A gave a successful demo of the oil pigment process a couple of weeks ago, and I have recently had some success with bromoil. I will probably write up a brief article on bromoil in the next couple of months. I need time to organize my thoughts on how to do all the necessary tests and calibrations. There are so many variables that it is inevitable no two people will ever use exactly the same procedure.

  7. #17
    ann
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    I am about to try some bromoil prints and have about got all the necessary tools, materials, etc.
    Have been doing lots of research and am now down to the inks. As with everything else there seems to be different views on who's . Am considering Bostick and Sullivan or David Lewis's ink. My biggest concern is managing the consistency . Any suggetions?

    David Lewis has several types of oil for thining (?) and beeswax for hardening. Should both types of oil be purchased along with the beeswax?
    I realize this is one of those personal perferences, but am just trying to get some current views.

    Reviewed Ed's article and discovered that I had collected a few bushes that ended up being useful. I was just looking for something along the lines of stencil brushes so it was a shot in the dark. The paper was very helpful, especially when i got to the supply list . Thanks.

  8. #18
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Ann, check out this link, if you havn't already visited it.

    http://www.silverlight.net/alt-photo/bromoil/
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  9. #19
    ann
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    thanks, I have been there several times,
    Have ordered Laughter's video as i thought this would give me a pictorial of techniques. I also sent him an email regarding workshops, but alas and alack no response.

    At least to the written verbage the processes seems pretty straight forward, it would appear that the trick is with inking and the placement of the ink on the print. Am sure that is just going to be lots of practice.

    But since i have no experience with any painting techniques that is going to be the challenge.

  10. #20
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    I watched a demonstration last week. The ink used was very thick, almost solid, and applied very sparingly indeed. That said the image did come up suprisingly quickly. One of our group's members, David Newton, uses a decorators paint roller to ink his prints! Works for him, three of his prints are on our site: www.emmg.graphy.org.uk in his gallery, but look so much better in the hand of course.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


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