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  1. #1

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    Seaweed Emulsions & Coatings

    Anyone know anyone (besides me) that is working with this?

    I am interested in methods of increasing the water resistance of seaplant gelatins and fucoids... some kind of hardening agent... do aldehyde compounds and such work on sea gelatins?

    Also, there is a type of seaweed here that responds to light... contact exposures are very long and images fade in a day... any ideas for fixing seaweed?

    Also, I have found a red algae that produces a gelatin that gives a creamy gloss coat to my platininum prints while adding considerable depth to the blacks (more than commercial coatings I have tried)... most sea gelatins I find on drying actually reduce dmax... any ideas about the perminence of these types of coatings?

    Cheers & Thanks... Annie

  2. #2
    juan's Avatar
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    I don't know, but I'm glad to see you back. You always ask the most provoking questions.
    juan

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    This can get very interesting. It makes me wonder if Pacific kelp would work. I know that Kelco corporation provides the gelatinous material from it to use in everything from lipstick to ice cream, but never thought of using it in photographic printing.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4

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    Pacific kelp... there are hundreds of variaties... I had some success with Alaria... what you don't use for emusion you can sprinkle on your salad.

    Rockweed boiled up produces copious amounts of fucoid that can be dried down to a powder... but it is a humicant so there are moisture issues... mind you the fresh gel is great if you get a sunburn while photographing at the beach.

    The red seaweeds like Irradia produce a good gelatin and they also are resistant to molds.

  5. #5

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    agar agar is 'gelatine'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Annie View Post
    Pacific kelp... there are hundreds of variaties... I had some success with Alaria... what you don't use for emusion you can sprinkle on your salad.

    Rockweed boiled up produces copious amounts of fucoid that can be dried down to a powder... but it is a humicant so there are moisture issues... mind you the fresh gel is great if you get a sunburn while photographing at the beach.

    The red seaweeds like Irradia produce a good gelatin and they also are resistant to molds.
    are you using "gelatine" as a generic term? all the gels made from seaweeds were called agar -agar when i was a kid and they were use as a medium for culturing bacterial/fungoid growth

    the animal proteins in gelatine are capable of tanning , just like like animal hide/skin, and so you get a 'leather' that is of course very strong-hide glue being a very hard high tensile gelatine

    if i get a 'sea moss' beverage at an ital eatary it is recomended as a digestive aid and a bulking cleanser for the bowels so i have a pre-predjudice in my mind set re sea weed gels-can you help me out of this please?

    vaya con dios

  6. #6

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    Seaweeds do not contan collagen so they do not produce gelatins... so I use the term generically...

    Not all seaweeds gels are suitable for the production of agar...

    good luck with your bowels.

  7. #7

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    hardeners for sea gels

    Quote Originally Posted by Annie View Post
    Seaweeds do not contan collagen so they do not produce gelatins... so I use the term generically...

    Not all seaweeds gels are suitable for the production of agar...

    good luck with your bowels.
    have you had any success hardening seaweed gels?

    potasium alum is recomended by some for a softer setup and longer working time with animal gels-any experience with this?

    this is a direction i had not thought of and it is a very real contribution to the mix here-i am using 'gum' other than 'gum arabic' and i find myself in un-charted waters

    i have had good success with the new style spray starches for ironing that are formed from celulose compounds other than the classic 'starch'-both as an undercoat and as a final finish-might be compatable with your usage

    arrowroot as a proven component in old tech 'emulsions' was used to get a matte finish instead of the high gloss that albumin usually makes-therefore i am not surprised that you got a lower d-max when you over coated platinum with seaweed

    am i correct in assuming that the seaweed gels are primarily starch?

    many thanx for your interesting and

  8. #8

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    yum yum by gum

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    This can get very interesting. It makes me wonder if Pacific kelp would work. I know that Kelco corporation provides the gelatinous material from it to use in everything from lipstick to ice cream, but never thought of using it in photographic printing.
    noel-this is the"non-nutritional" powder additive that makes up the bulk of the mix for the various 'shakes' that are sold in frnchise fastfood shops-yes? and in soft 'icecreams?

    any thoughts about adding this stuff to gum arabic and or other emulsions?

    i am fascinated with the possibilities for modern tech common additives-polysorbates and the poly-what? 80 used to bulk out shampoo's etc

    any thoughts and exp re this line of thinking?

    vaya con dios

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by z-man View Post
    are you using "gelatine" as a generic term? all the gels made from seaweeds were called agar -agar when i was a kid and they were use as a medium for culturing bacterial/fungoid growth

    the animal proteins in gelatine are capable of tanning , just like like animal hide/skin, and so you get a 'leather' that is of course very strong-hide glue being a very hard high tensile gelatine

    if i get a 'sea moss' beverage at an ital eatary it is recomended as a digestive aid and a bulking cleanser for the bowels so i have a pre-predjudice in my mind set re sea weed gels-can you help me out of this please?

    vaya con dios

    the agar plates i coated in lab were made from sheep blood, i didn't know
    they made them from sea weeds too...

    all this talk about kelp is making me hungry, i wish the japanese place was open, i could go for a bit of seaweed salad, and some soft serve icecream afterwards.

    great post annie!

    john
    ask me how ..

  10. #10

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    you are correct john, agar-agar and sheep blood is (was) one of the basic media used.

    annie's post is most intereting, and makes me wonder what other forms of gelatine are out there that could be used. Thanks!!
    Mike C

    Rambles

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