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  1. #11
    Toffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie gunks View Post
    sounds great. i love shooting pinholes. one suggestion. why not use a 6 inch box? you would get an f stop of about 330. that may reduce your exposure times. i shoot 8x10 with this set up and it is a good FL.

    keep us posted.

    eddie
    Hi Eddie;

    My first attempts started with a simple (available) box that could:
    1) easily be lightproofed.
    2) hold some 8X10 sheets I had already prepped.

    That is why my focal length was set at 11" (the depth of my box)

    My results... it took about 5 hours to achieve what amounted to slight fogging of the sheet. At 8 hours there was still no appreciable image. My guess is that at this point my paper is more baked than exposed.

    We're not finished yet. I will try again with a shallower box, as you suggest, and perhaps a larger aperture. I'm not versed enough on aperture theory or the relative sensitivity of my treated paper to really predict what my exposure times should be. I'm betting if the rain holds off, I may actually have an image soon.

    Cheers, (this is fun)
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  2. #12
    Toffle's Avatar
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    While I'm working towards (waiting for?) success, I am wondering:

    Is it actually possible to photograph a scene using cyanotype chemistry at all? The reason for this question is that I don't know how much UV light is reflected in a multi-hued scene. I know that the visible light in front of my camera is being projected on the treated paper inside. That much is plain physics. What I don't know is whether there is enough UV light in that projected image to create an image on the treated paper. (That's physics, too, but nothing that I can quantify.)

    Any ideas, before I load up my box camera again?

    cheers,
    Last edited by Toffle; 08-24-2007 at 07:59 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  3. #13
    DBP
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    As far as I know, relatively few substances reflect UV, so you may be chasing the impossible here. What are you attempting to photograph?

  4. #14
    Toffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    As far as I know, relatively few substances reflect UV, so you may be chasing the impossible here. What are you attempting to photograph?
    For now, I have my setup in my backyard. (someplace I can leave it for several hours untouched.) The scene is flowers, trees, sand, and water. I was hoping that over the long (looong) exposure times necessary for cyanotype images there would be enough UV reflected to create a decent image. If I'm mistaken, all I've wasted is a few sheets of treated paper and a few hours sitting in my own backyard.

    Cheers,
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  5. #15

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    Hello, first of all, sorry to dig up this rather old topic.

    I am interested in a simple photography project as well.
    Since Cyanotypes seem to be the simplest project to create pictures via light, I thought to give it a try.
    I can see the problem with the exposure time and the low uv-reflection of objects, but maybee the long time, change of the sun and heat is the biggest problem, so I was wondering if one of the "enhanced" cyanotype-formulas would bring other results?

    Different methods that are based on cyanotypes to reach very low exposure times can be found on the great site
    http://www.mikeware.demon.co.uk/

    so this might be a solution? Even if very low UV light is beeing reflected, it might be enough to bring a picture on paper that has been treated with a alternative process?

  6. #16

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    Hi Toffle,

    I don't believe you'll be able to get a decent image in those conditions (any cyanotype formula and a ~ f/360 pinhole that is). I remember someone using cyanotype treated paper as negatives (it was an article or gallery in photo.net) and the photographer was using a simple one element lens (very large aperture ~ f/2 - 2.8) to create images outdoors. IIRC, the exposure times were not less than 30 minutes. Then the papers were developed, scanned and inverted in an image editing program giving nice brown positive images...

    You may be rowing against a very strong stream (as we say here in Turkey, hope that makes sense to you)...

    Regards,
    Loris.

    Quote Originally Posted by Toffle View Post
    For now, I have my setup in my backyard. (someplace I can leave it for several hours untouched.) The scene is flowers, trees, sand, and water. I was hoping that over the long (looong) exposure times necessary for cyanotype images there would be enough UV reflected to create a decent image. If I'm mistaken, all I've wasted is a few sheets of treated paper and a few hours sitting in my own backyard.

    Cheers,

  7. #17

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    I'dd be happy with some skyline/landscape b/w contrast images :-)
    Also, I have read up a bit on anthotypes
    ( http://www.alternativephotography.co...es/art098.html )
    since it will be easier and more fromscratch if I do this with kids.
    Some plants only need 1-3 hours of exposure, which is relativly low, I wonder what light spectrum does the trick- so maybee its more likely to use this in a pinhole camera thats steadily fixed to a high contrast landscape or skyline for example?

    Since it is positive developing too, it would be ready to view instantly, only downside is that there seems to be no way to stop the exposure except for keeping it stored in a dark place...

  8. #18

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    Sorry for doubleposting, but has anyone tried cyanotype rex?
    This seems to be the answer to direct photography, since the improved versions will make it possible to use "regular" light spectrum & very quick exposure:
    http://www.f295.org/Pinholeforum/for.../m-1137519426/

  9. #19

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    Hi,

    I would like to point you all who are intended to make in-camera exposure using *any* cyanotype formula to the address I provide below :

    http://www.usask.ca/lists/alt-photo-.../msg00420.html

    In short: Don't waste your time...

    Regards,
    Loris.

    Quote Originally Posted by schorhr View Post
    Sorry for doubleposting, but has anyone tried cyanotype rex?
    This seems to be the answer to direct photography, since the improved versions will make it possible to use "regular" light spectrum & very quick exposure:
    http://www.f295.org/Pinholeforum/for.../m-1137519426/

  10. #20
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schorhr View Post
    I'dd be happy with some skyline/landscape b/w contrast images :-)
    Also, I have read up a bit on anthotypes
    ( http://www.alternativephotography.co...es/art098.html )
    since it will be easier and more fromscratch if I do this with kids.
    Some plants only need 1-3 hours of exposure, which is relativly low, I wonder what light spectrum does the trick- so maybee its more likely to use this in a pinhole camera thats steadily fixed to a high contrast landscape or skyline for example?

    Since it is positive developing too, it would be ready to view instantly, only downside is that there seems to be no way to stop the exposure except for keeping it stored in a dark place...
    I do wonder which plants take that short of a time because all of my anthotype (okay, 2-3 of them I've tried) exposures last about 3 days. The best so far has been purple iris juices (crush with mortar&pestle, filter&squeeze juice through a coffee filter and paint on watercolour paper). I've tried purple sage (no solar colour change after 3-4 days) and red cabbage (raw, finely chopped in food processor, squeezed and filtered as above). now having read the article, I'll try the nasturium leaves thing if I get any more sunshine after today).

    It's not really positive developing, as in you can't just shoot in a camera. You put a negative over the dried paper that you've covered with the juices then expose to sunlight until an image is produced (pick up some small splitback frames on ebay for cheap if you just want to try this out).
    Last edited by Akki14; 09-13-2007 at 07:23 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: read webpage, duh.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

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