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  1. #21

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    on the alt photo website it makes no mention of using alcohol, and when i did this a while back
    i just used plants ... whey are you using alcohol ?

    thanks

    john

  2. #22

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    I use alcohol because it helps to get the pigment out of a non juicy leaf, and helps to make the pigment into "paint".

    I have had a bit of feedback it seems poppy's fade

  3. #23

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    I have had a lot of success

    Hello,

    I am not sure if anyone is still following this forum but anyway...
    I have used a variety of leaves and found that the ones that work best are the type that grow in shaded areas such as nasturtium, ayrum lily and spinach.

    I have used the leaves whole and contact printed onto them using a positive inkjet transperancy (two layers of the same image), I use the sun to make my exposure which could be from 2 hours to 1 week depending on the weather. I was doing this is New Zealand but it was Wellington and during winter, I haven't tried it since moving to the Northern hemipshere.

    You can see my images at http://photogirl.co.nz/chlorophyll.html

    I also extracted the chlorophyll from silverbeet without using any chemicals and painted that onto paper and made a print in the same way as before. It works quite well but the range of tones is less than a leaf itself.

    I exhibited my leaf prints inside behind UV glass and they did fade much to my horror. The ones that have been stored in an album have not faded at all.

    I have tried asking a few scientists about how to "fix" them but no luck so far.

  4. #24
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photogirl28 View Post
    Hello,

    I am not sure if anyone is still following this forum but anyway...
    I have used a variety of leaves and found that the ones that work best are the type that grow in shaded areas such as nasturtium, ayrum lily and spinach.

    I have used the leaves whole and contact printed onto them using a positive inkjet transperancy (two layers of the same image), I use the sun to make my exposure which could be from 2 hours to 1 week depending on the weather. I was doing this is New Zealand but it was Wellington and during winter, I haven't tried it since moving to the Northern hemipshere.

    You can see my images at http://photogirl.co.nz/chlorophyll.html

    I also extracted the chlorophyll from silverbeet without using any chemicals and painted that onto paper and made a print in the same way as before. It works quite well but the range of tones is less than a leaf itself.

    I exhibited my leaf prints inside behind UV glass and they did fade much to my horror. The ones that have been stored in an album have not faded at all.

    I have tried asking a few scientists about how to "fix" them but no luck so far.
    Very nice images you produced there.

    I am interested in trying this process. The suggestion of blueberries seems interesting, or maybe red wine. We'll see what comes out!

  5. #25

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    The season for plant juice photography is upon us.

    At least for those of us in the northern hemisphere.

    It was probably a tough short spring for many, but I hope anyone interested in this subject got there plants clipped, petals cut, or roots mashed.

    I will be doing more anthotypes very soon, because the sun will be shining at full speed ahead here in the California desert after June.

    I have also used inkjet positives like photogirl28 but not on a transparency, but rather on inkjet paper itself and the image side facing the anthotype paper within the frame. This produces a mirror image of the original.

    Here is one anthotype I did last year:

    Musical Repose

    Blended Beets, cheap vodka, and distilled water on watercolor paper. 3 weeks exposure facing the desert sun as much as possible.

    I suppose doubling the positive will allow for a darker definition in the image, I think I will try that.

    One of the other things I would like to try for this, is a motorized solar tracking frame. It gets very tedious moving a chair 3 to 6 times a day to track the sun, that is provided a person has time to do this. Afterall, who wants to spend their vacation time (about 3 weeks) moving a picture frame in a 180 degree or less arcing curve.

    I would also like to thank Akki14 for providing the inspiration to do the anthotype process in the first place, her Purple Iris Southbank image was the first anthotype image I found that made me want to do one myself.

    I find this subject fascinating, and a building experience in patience.

    And for those who do not think they have the patience, I am not sure if it is true, but I have read that blueberry juice and 4 to 6 hours exposure from a UV lamp will bring up an image.

    BTW does anyone know what plants will yield darker greens? Most greens I have seen are bit on the yellow end.

  6. #26

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    I have not played alt photo for a while now but i have also tried red rose petals, they took weeks to fade, but also tried food dye, that works to !, watered down some what

  7. #27

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    New plan

    All,

    Saw this thread and had to post,

    it may not be so helpful,

    But I've had some good luck using a tincture of ingredients:

    Green Leaves, or Other Chlorophyll laden items,
    Denatured Alcohol (Diluted to <%10 with distilled water)
    Hydrogen Peroxide (%0.5 solution)

    The Peroxide Helps as an oxidant, While I've only been able to
    work through this with Greens and if you decide to try you might
    have some discolorations at first, and I use Denat. Alcohol
    (like the kind used for brush cleaning or paint removal) diluted because
    of the strength, but this is optional i like it because it dries quickly.

    Maybe It'll help

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