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  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I am not sure what this means about pouring the developer over the print in the tray???
    Mark are you using a single tray method for this work???
    If so I can see the lag time between dev and stop will be a nightmare to control.
    just a bit confused.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Crawford View Post
    PS. I forgot to say that if you pour the developer over the print from a jug, it may cause more problems with splashes and areas starting to develop too quickly.
    Mike

  2. #12
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I am not sure what this means about pouring the developer over the print in the tray???
    Mark are you using a single tray method for this work???
    If so I can see the lag time between dev and stop will be a nightmare to control.
    just a bit confused.
    No, I am working from a set of trays. I just thought I might be able to get the developer to cover the print more quickly and evenly if I did that. Sandy King recommends that approach for platinum printing. After developing, I'd pour it back into a container to get ready for the next print. From Mike's comments, I think I'll try his method first.

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    For lith printing I would not use a pour on technique but rather use lots of chems in an over size tray and immerse the print quickly and agitate very quickly for the first 15 seconds of development to make sure you have covered the emuslion.
    I would also transfer the print when you think and agitate for the first 15 seconds in the stop. this is an explosive dev process and timing is of major importance. There should be no wait times as with normal silver or platinum printing.
    What you are most likely seeing is developer continuing before it is properly stopped.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Fisher View Post
    No, I am working from a set of trays. I just thought I might be able to get the developer to cover the print more quickly and evenly if I did that. Sandy King recommends that approach for platinum printing. After developing, I'd pour it back into a container to get ready for the next print. From Mike's comments, I think I'll try his method first.

  4. #14

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    Mark
    I endorse what both Mike and Bob say here. The jug method has some advantages in Pt pehaps but for lith I would suggest using a large tray, large volume and slide in the print evenly and quickly.
    If you are using dilute developer and long dev times (say 15 to 25 mins) the entry phase is not too critical!
    Tim

  5. #15

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    The upper defect you have circled is well-defined and lighter than the surroundings. Is there any chance at all that this is on the negative? Just for giggles, if you ever pull that neg out again print a little test strip of that area at high contrast and see if it's still there.

  6. #16
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Ullsmith View Post
    The upper defect you have circled is well-defined and lighter than the surroundings. Is there any chance at all that this is on the negative? Just for giggles, if you ever pull that neg out again print a little test strip of that area at high contrast and see if it's still there.
    Definitely not. I had similar problems but in different areas. I have not got back into the darkroom yet to give it another go yet, but I will either tomorrow or over the weekend.

    Thanks for all the advice folks -- Mark

  7. #17
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    I ran into this with Polywarmtone in LITH AND regular developer. I used to place my prints into the dev tray emulsion side down for the first 30 seconds and then flip the print. It was something that I was taught from the beginning to make sure of even print development. I am using 15 year old plastic paterson trays, and this could still happen. I am firmly of the belief that the molding sprue at the center of the tray is the culprit. If there is even the faintest piece of plastic sticking up, it could rub the the emulsion and cause these marks. After I changed my technique to put the paper into the dev emulsion side up, no problems like this have ever occurred since. I am not sure what make your trays are, or your processing technique was, but this certainly solved mine.

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