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  1. #141
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Scott. I think any differences in the sugar developers would be so subtle that you wouldn't notice any difference in performance whatsoever. But give them a try and do a comparison. Let us know what you think.

  2. #142

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    I found that Coffer's formula of no alcohol to the sugar developer causes several problems, including holes in the development, weird colorations, etc. Quinn's formula has worked better for me.

    I got some neat effects with vigorous shaking of my helper tray. That caused a frothing of the developer in the corners and I got some neat bubbling. Now I intentionally do that if I know the edges and corners don't have any details that I want to preserve. It's amazing how I've gone from trying to achieve perfection (and never achieved it) with film negatives having no scratches or imperfections, and now I hope that I get some flaws. Heck, I even think about intentionally breaking a glass neg just to get the cracked effect.

  3. #143
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Just to clarify what Bill said... In the field, the fix is ALWAYS outside of the camper. Fixing/rinsing is only done outside and the waste water is collected separately from the wastewater from development/rinsing. Also, I fix in a tray and never have more than 200 or 300 ml of fix in solution.
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  4. #144

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    I'm amazed at the number of people who have their KCN in a darkbox just inches from the developer. I'm way too sloppy for that. If it can be spilled, I'll spill it.

  5. #145
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik View Post
    Just to clarify what Bill said... In the field, the fix is ALWAYS outside of the camper. Fixing/rinsing is only done outside and the waste water is collected separately from the wastewater from development/rinsing. Also, I fix in a tray and never have more than 200 or 300 ml of fix in solution.
    Thanks for clearing that up Kerik. A cloud of cyanide gas inside that camper/darkroom could really ruin your day.

  6. #146
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    Okay, I had some more time with the collodion
    I'm pretty comfortable with pouring the plate.
    The only thing is buildup along the two pour off edges.
    Is that normal?

    A couple of areas of concern are developing and varnishing.
    Varnishing is pretty straight forward except the pour off edges.
    I have to try really hard to get any build up off those edges or it will flow back when heated.
    Any suggestions?

    Ahhh development....
    I noticed something today when taking the plate out of the holder after exposure. There was some obvious build up of solution on one edge. I notice that the plate has quite a bit of 'mobile' fluid on it when taking it out of the bath.
    Do yall try to let that drain off more than just a few seconds?
    I'm using a dry plate holder that hits the plate all the way around about 1/8".
    So the liquid come in contact. I do dry it well between plates though.
    Also, I'm getting a bit of collodion on the back of the plate so I don't know if that's part of the issue with scum and swirlies.

    As for the development. I am definitely trying to keep those times down and that seems to help with the 'scum.' However, there is still some there that doesn't wipe off. BTW anything wrong with just using your finger to wipe off the plate?

    When done 'in hand' how exactly is the developer poured on?


    I know that's a lot of questions but if you can answer anyone of them I'd appreciate the help.
    Thanks
    Scott

  7. #147
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Scott, I'm getting the same ledge along the pour off edges. I wondering if that isn't normal or if my pours are to much in volume and the collodion is setting up before it has a chance to run off. I've been siding on to much collodion on a pour instead of having a short pour. The ridges along the edge aren't very noticable after the plate is processed, But very much so before hand. You may want to post this question on the other forum. Robert

  8. #148
    Ty G
    Yes, the ridges are common. They will vary in thickness with collodion formula's as well as temperatures sometimes. A high alcohol collodion is more "runny" and will have less buildup.

    I wouldn't try to rub the scum off with your finger. The roughness will tear the wet collodion.

    In-hand development is just holding the plate with one hand and slowly pour the developer across the plate and not letting it spill off. Rock the plate back and forth allowing developer the work around the plate, then pour off when done. This is the only development method I use.

    Development times, in my opinion are just a goal, not a rule. I regularly go for 30 seconds depending on temp, humidity, etc.

  9. #149
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    Hello,

    I've seen some really nice stuff in WPC lately and have been thinking about giving it a go.

    I also work in Palladium (standard, although I'd like to try Ziatype in my next chem order) and also a little solarplate/photogravure ...

    Couple of questions - I see the results are quite high-contrast >would the negative process yield a good neg for palladium printing ? I could simply replace the glass in my contact frame with the glass neg... very nice if possible.

    The positive obtained by using a black-backing as I understand it is an optical effect, like holding standard negs up to a light... so I couldn't use it as a transparency for solarplate ? (which uses positives to expose the plate)


    I have an 8x10 Sinar P with a 360mm lens that covers 11x14 - I am thinking of making a 11x14 wet plate back that can also reduce to hold smaller sizes, and a simple GG for composition - I'll make a simple bag bellows or three for different focusing distances (infinity and a good portrait size for 8x10 and 11x14 magnification maybe)

    Are there any instructions or drawings of how a simple wet plate holder is put together ? Just the essentials really, I can work out the rest.

    In the meantime I could just stick to 8x10 and use my current Sinar rear frame with a modified Lisco/Fidelity holder - any instructions on how to modify them ?

    It would be a really nice feeling if I could cut out using film altogether...
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  10. #150
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Mark Osterman's film holder conversion from The Collodion Journal

    Instead of using the silver wire, I think most of us have simply affixed plastic or aluminum corners to the face of the cut-out septum. This puts the plate surface at the right distance. (I put a small piece of sheet film under my corners as a spacer to ensure the correct focal plane.)

    You can see how I converted an 11x14 dryplate holder for wetplate use by using acrylic corners in the attached pics. I removed the septum and used the resultant slot to hold the corners. I used this method in case I wanted to replace the corners easily. 10x12 is the maximum plate size I use. A converted film/dryplate holder usually has a plate size capacity slightly small than the original format (e.g., 1/4-plate in a 4x5 holder, 10x12 in an 11x14, etc.,).

    There's a guy on eBay selling a manual on "How To Make a Wetplate Holder" and also "How To Make a Wetplate Camera," each at ~$20USD IIRC. I have the holder manual and though I haven't made a holder yet, his instructions seem like they would work adequately. The instructions are for making a small holder (1/4-plate IIRC) though the dimensions could be expanded for other sizes. Even if you don't make the holder to his instructions, the manual will give you an idea on what they look like. Also, if you make the largest size you'll need, smaller inserts can be made for other formats.

    I just purchased a wetplate camera off eBay and the listing for item #290171241838 with pics of the holder, inserts, and wetplate back is still up. The pics can give you an idea of the back & holder construction.

    Joe
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails holder_corner_01.jpg   holder_corner_02.jpg   holder_corner_03.jpg  
    Last edited by smieglitz; 11-11-2007 at 07:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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