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  1. #21
    RobertP's Avatar
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    http://www.apug.org/forums/attachmen...76176....14x14 wet plate tailboard camera with 1861 Jamin Darlot lens
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN0007.jpg   DSCN0008.jpg   DSCN0010.jpg  

  2. #22
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    I think Coffer's book is the most popular and straightforward. It would be the first on I would recommend, especially with the DVD set. It does help to actually see someone experienced go through the process either on video or at a workshop.

    Thge plain collodion USP is a mixture of guncotton dissolved in ether and ethanol. You still have to add the salts that will become light sensitive in the silver nitrate solution, and, additional thinning of the collodion is needed by adding ether and alcohol to the mix. Some people use grain alcohol (it needs to be ~190 proof ethanol to keep additional water out of the sensitized collodion) and some use denatured alcohol because of its low cost. It appears that additional ether may not actually be needed unless one is striving to do everything as period as possible.

    I started to experiment with using a collodion thinned with only grain alcohol (omitting additional ether) and it seemed to work fairly well. My choice of salts confounded the experiment a bit, and I did not get very far with it this summer, but it looks promising and others report that salted collodions without additional ether work well for them.

    Here's a full-plate ruby ambrotype from that experimental mix:


    APUG's own Daniel Lin

    This one was made on purple glass using sodium bromide and sodium iodide salts in the mix. Those salts seem to make the collodion set quicker and reduce the time available to work with the material compared to other salts (of pottassium, ammonia, cadmium, etc.).

    I usually use my developer and then save and filter it. After it is filtered, I mix it half and half with fresh developer to actually get a bit more silver deposited on the plate (the first use strips some silver off the plate and puts it into the developer) and to shift the color more neutral.

    A couple reasons for not dip/dunking the plate in collodion:

    1) a thick coating is hard to properly clear
    2) any solution on the back of the plate may migrate to the front and cause artifacts (e.g., "oysters") that most don't want in their plates. The rapid evaporation of ether and alcohol wicks everything to the front of the plate. This is also why points of contact are reduced between the plate and holder, and why dryplate holders won't work well for wetplate.
    3) collodion and some of the salts are fairly expensive and coating the back would waste the materials for no benefit.

  3. #23
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Great Robert! Now I see. That's a sweet camera you have there! That holder looks really nice. It looks like it is one side only. Is that correct? I would assume most wet plate holders are just one side unlike the double sided sheet holders and possibly dry plates??

  4. #24
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Yes wet plate holders are one sided.

  5. #25
    RobertP's Avatar
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    http://www.apug.org/forums/attachmen...377982...Scott, I'm very new to the process too but I'm having a ball with it. It is possible to get decent plates from the start. The skill is in the pouring of the plates to get full coverage and a nice even coat. Here is one of my very first plates that I attempted on my own. I spent a few days with John Coffer to get me started and I highly recommend his workshop. Robert
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  6. #26
    RobertP's Avatar
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    oh by the way.....My pours got worse the emptier that bottle got.

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The Formulary sells readymade collodion.

    IMHO, one of the worlds foremost experts on collodion among other older processes is Mark Osterman from George Eastman House. Contact with him or one of their other conservators might be of some help to you getting reference material or information.

    PE

  8. #28
    schrochem's Avatar
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    Smieglitz, thanks for the added information on the process and why not to dip. I plan to send off for Coffer's set tomorrow. Also, thanks for the plate on Daniel (another apuger's work I enjoy). It was interesting to hear about the variables with the salts. I'll also admit that I'm not exactly concerned with period accuracy, but rather I'd like to explore the possibilities of the process. Which this thread has really gotten me excited!

  9. #29
    RobertP's Avatar
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    PE, Yes I know Mark and France. I think John made mention that they were students of his at one time or they worked together in some capacity . John just lives 90 miles south of them.

  10. #30

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    Hey RObert,

    Why is the plate backward? Is that normal or was it a mistake in the scanning?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

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