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  1. #11
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photomc View Post
    The product from Kodak was crocein scarlet, I believe. No longer available from Kodak, I'm afraid (I could use a bottle myself). Might be able to find some old stock or even someone that wants to get rid of a bottle. Not sure what is available at this time like it (thought crocein scarlet is used for other things).

    Small bottle would last a lifetime.
    It's available on eBay.

  2. #12

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    Yes spotting the negative is the correct way to deal with this problem. You can get very fine brushes (just a few bristles thick) from art supply and hobby stores. Use a loupe. There have been many solutions available for doing this., from the ones mentioned above, to others. Most 4x5 b/w films have a retouchable surface on the base side of the film. That means they will accept retouching materials. Normal practice is to apply retouching materials to the back, or base side of the negative. In retouching clear pinholes, the goal is to opaque them so they appear clear (white) on the print, which can then be dye-spotted down to the correct density on the final prints.

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