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  1. #21

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    David, you are correct John Stevenson has 'closed'. The gallery is now on 27th st (?) and only open by appointment and has a permanent exhibit of painting hanging.

  2. #22

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    Hi,

    I saw this thread and looked in up in my ‘bible’, Sowerby, A.L.M. (ed.) (1961) Dictionary of Photography: A Reference Book for Amateur and Professional Photographers 19th ed. London: Iliffe Books Ltd. (pp 38-39). This book describes Artigue’s or Fresson Process as “A method of carbon printing without transfer, as invented by M. Artigue of Paris”. It gives a working method due mostly to a M. Duchochois for which it claims, if carefully followed, gives results very similar to M. Artigue’s “Papiers Velours”. I don’t want to copy the whole article so I shall summarise as best I can. I hope the following will help you and others wanting to work this process.

    In 15 parts of water, dissolve 5 pieces of white and carefully picked gum Arabic – you should select the “round and slightly friable lumps”. Dissolution can sometimes take days. Strain the mucilage through muslin and add 100 parts of egg white and enough “…Indian ink or other finely ground water-colour sufficient to give a coating on paper, which shall be nearly full black or full coloured by reflected light, but not so opaque as altogether to obscure a coin behind the paper when both are held up to the window”. Make the mixture “slightly alkaline to test paper” by stirring in liquid ammonia. “…A minimum of two drops to each fluid ounce may be added anyway”. The preparation is now ready for coating onto paper.

    “A fine paper, such as “Rives” should be used, and this should be coated with a film of plain gelatine before applying the pigmented mixture”. This may consist of one part of hard gelatine to eight parts of water. “Soak [the gelatine], strain [the dissolved gelatine] through muslin into a warmed porcelain dish”. Do not allow the gelatine to cool. Float each sheet of paper for an instant and dry. The paper is now ready for coating. Brush on a thin layer of the Indian ink mixture using a broad camel’s-hair brush.

    To sensitise the paper, float it “face upwards, on a solution of ammonium bichromate containing one part of the salt dissolved in between 10 and 20 parts of water”. “The criterion is the penetration of the bichromate to the surface of the paper, and when this is the case the pigmented film can be rubbed off by gentle action of the finger”. Dry the paper then expose under a negative “until details are visible at the back” (presumably meaning the back of the negative).

    Development varies and depends upon “atmospheric conditions and other circumstances which affect the solubility of the pigmented film”. We are then directed to follow the methods used in developing a gum-bichromate print, from which I quote:

    “The exposed print is now soaked in cold water, and if the colour soon begins to wash off the paper on rocking the dish, under-exposure is indicated; and in this case cold water alone may finish the development.

    According to the behaviour of the print, warmer and warmer water may be used, and to increase the detergent power of the water a stream may be poured from a height on the surface of the print. When the development is complete, the print may be soaked in an alum bath, after which it is allowed to dry”. (p. 359).

    Back to page 39, we are told: “When the basis is smooth paper coated with gelatine, it becomes almost essential to adopt M. Artigue’s expedient of developing with a soup-like mixture of ground sawdust and water”. This can be of any wood, but should be either ground in a roller mill or sifted through a No.12 sieve (12 meshes to a linear inch). Mix with water at the required temperature to “the consistency of soup”, flush this over the pigmented surface until development is completed.

    If the O.P. wishes, I can scan the full article; post it to my webspace and P.M. the U.R.L.

    HTH,
    kevs
    testing...

  3. #23
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    I have a book called HISTORY and PRACTICE OF CARBON PROCESSES BY LUIS NADEAU which has a segment holding a ton of information on the Fresson process if anyone would like any of this information don't hesitate to contact me.

    ~Steve
    The Lighthouse lab

  4. #24
    Marc Akemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevs View Post
    Hi,

    I saw this thread and.....
    If the O.P. wishes, I can scan the full article; post it to my webspace and P.M. the U.R.L.

    HTH,
    kevs
    Thank you very much for taking the time to summarize the info you have. I would love to see the full article!

    There is a slight difference in materials between M. Duchochois' version and the version in the book I just purchased. Duchochois' recipe is like a mix between gum bichromate and carbon processes, I believe. Maybe the Fresson process is, too.

  5. #25
    Marc Akemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    I have a book called HISTORY and PRACTICE OF CARBON PROCESSES BY LUIS NADEAU which has a segment holding a ton of information on the Fresson process if anyone would like any of this information don't hesitate to contact me.

    ~Steve
    The Lighthouse lab
    Thanks Steve! I'll PM you for the info.

    Here's an interesting link that leads to how Luis Nadeau acquired the equipment to make the Fresson paper: http://www.apogeephoto.com/mag7-6/ortiz_echague.shtml .

    Marc

  6. #26
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    fresson extract

    perhaps this will be of some intrest
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1.jpg   2.jpg   3.jpg   4.jpg   5.jpg  

    6.jpg   7.jpg   8.jpg   9.jpg   10.jpg  


  7. #27
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    fresson extract part 2

    this is part 2
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 11.jpg   12.jpg   13.jpg   14.jpg   15.jpg  


  8. #28

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    FilmSprocket, i'll scan the article tonight and PM you the link.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  9. #29
    Marc Akemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevs View Post
    FilmSprocket, i'll scan the article tonight and PM you the link.
    Cheers,
    kevs
    Got it! Excellent! Thank you very much!

    Marc

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    I have a book called HISTORY and PRACTICE OF CARBON PROCESSES BY LUIS NADEAU which has a segment holding a ton of information on the Fresson process if anyone would like any of this information don't hesitate to contact me.

    ~Steve
    The Lighthouse lab
    hi steve, if you don't mind i would like to have the information too
    Thanks in advance

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