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  1. #11
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    Way more fun in a poorly vented area! Ether, gun-cotton, Everclear, Potassium Cyanide, open flame! What could be better? ;-)
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  2. #12

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    One thing for the OP is that there are still at least some wetplate practioners in the third world, primarly ( i think) the middle east. These are often street photographers peddeling little tintypes. I met a photographer from Egypt who told me this is still fairly common as the chemistry is still cheap and avaliable.

    I just did a shoot using an old bank vault (read no ventilation) as a makeshift darkroom. I wont work without ventilation again.

  3. #13
    Ty G
    If the list includes the guys who use modern darkrooms, lights, cameras, enlargers, aluminum plates etc., then yes it may be over 1000. But if the list is to include only the guys who try to remain as historically correct as possible, then the list may only be 100 or so.

    Ty G
    www.tystintypes.com

  4. #14
    Quinn's Avatar
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    Greetings,

    First; access to the COLLODION.COM FORUM - Mr. Young is correct, I've been very busy and my junk mail filter is over active - I think several people have sent emails to join the board and the filter grabbed them (my apologies) - to resolve that, go here http://www.collodion.com/contact.asp and send me your info, I'll get it and I'll get you on the forum.

    Secondly, I believe there are fewer people working in wet plate on a "regular" basis than most think (but it is growing very fast). Most people, I would say 80-90%, that attend a workshop never make a plate at home. A few attempt the process, but most never get setup (equipment, etc.) or never get a handle on the chemistry (can't purchase it, mix it etc). Those that do go on to make images on their own are, relatively speaking, few. There are even fewer who can show you work produced in the last two weeks (at any give time); that's how I would define "regular basis" - producing work as you would with film or other image producing techniques.

    However, I may be totally off of the mark and completely up in the night - I usually am.
    Regards,
    Quinn Jacobson
    Artist, Photographer, & Educator
    http://www.studioQ.com

  5. #15

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    Thanks for the update Quinn! I got your book in from Amazon the other day, have read it cover to cover and and now putting together my first chemistry order. I'll keep everyone posted on my progress!

  6. #16
    Kerik's Avatar
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    I agree with Quinn's assessment. And, for me, this would include anyone using the wet plate collodion process, regardless of "historical correctness". Those concerned with historical correctness are a much smaller number are generally involved in the reencatment crowd. Most of us using the process to make art aren't concerned with those issues and are happy to use whatever modern tools and materials will facilitate the results we're after.
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  7. #17

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    wet plate

    I would love to do wet plate. I couldn't imagine doing it just on a workshop basis. It would have to be reasonably regular and definite aesthetic decision. I know it may be complicated, but then so is learning Lithuanian (next thing on the list..........) Kerik's work is amazing.

  8. #18

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    One MSDS I have found for ethyl ether states that a potential side-effect of the ether is "Psychic Disturbance." I think I know what they mean but using the word "psychic" makes it sound like the ghost of Frederick Scott Archer will visit me after breathing too many ether fumes.

    - Justin

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Silber View Post
    One MSDS I have found for ethyl ether states that a potential side-effect of the ether is "Psychic Disturbance." I think I know what they mean but using the word "psychic" makes it sound like the ghost of Frederick Scott Archer will visit me after breathing too many ether fumes.

    - Justin
    And that is a problem, young man?

  10. #20

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    I've noticed most of the people who demand "historical correctness" only practice "historical correctness" at their convenience. Yet they are quick to point out the incorrectness of others.

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