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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    Has anyone tried the warm white?
    Yes, tried it, way too warm for my taste. I ended using the paper as a substrate for my carbon tissue.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana Sullivan View Post
    I've ordered up some Stonehenge white and it should be here by the end of next week. I will have it in the giant 30x44" sheets, which will make it a very nice paper for larger prints, especially since it's got a good wet strength. It has a predictable lengthwise grain to it, so the surface has a nice even texture to it. We'll offer the monster 30x44" sheet as well as the 22x30" standard sheet.

    I'll also trim it down to 11x15" size sheets, for those looking to do smaller prints. Finally, I will be offering the Weston Diploma and the Stonehenge in 8x10" sheets as well.

    I'll be adding Arches Platine in 22x30", 30x44" and the usual cut sizes in the next week. Once we've got all the new papers squared away, we'll be offering APUG members another chance to get one of our free paper sample packs. Last time we did that, I sent out over 160 parcels, with 30-40 of them being outside the USA!

    I'll make the official announcement soon!
    I still don't see Platine on the Bostick-sullivan website. I hate the chore of cutting up 22x30 sheets, so I'd like to see 8-1/2x11 or 8x10 packaged with one deckle edge on every sheet. I have seen complaints about inconsistencies in Platine, but I have never had a bad sheet.

    Rising Stonehenge white was one of the first papers I used and there is a lot to like: very inexpensive, great wet strength, not too creamy, one side smooth the other with a bit more texture. But ... I find it grainy compared to Platine, with more contrast that has to be tamed with it's own curve.

    Other papers that you might want to consider:
    Lenox 100 -- fairly warm cream tone, pretty poor wet strength, but very smooth tones. Inexpensive (Daniel Smith)

    Rising Bristol single ply plate finish. Inexpensive, sharp! Benefits from flattening in a dry mount press after drying.

    There are a bunch of paper that work after an acid soak, but I have never found any extraordinary enough to justify the inconvenience.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by clay View Post
    Whoa! I haven't been keeping up with the price. Is it really that high right now? What does 100ml of potassium chloroplatinite cost now at B&S?


    Never mind. i just looked. $845. Makes the idea of sloppy borders and generous coating volumes sort of gulp-inducing.
    Wow! About two years ago someone who had to quit printing for health reasons gave me an unopened 250 ml bottle of potassium chloroplatinite, and several smaller 25ml bottle. I knew at the time it was worth some money, but I figured maybe $200, not over $2000! I think he had purchased it ten or more years ago.

    Should I be concerned that it will go bad, or is it stable in solution?

    Sandy King

  4. #44
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Sandy, from my experience it is pretty stable in solution. I have had some platinum particles revert back to a solid state over time. By warming the solution it goes back into the liquid form. I just zapped it for a couple of seconds in the microwave. A bath of hot water would also do the trick I'm sure. But in solution it should have an indefinite self life. Dana can probably give a much more indepth answer since he is the master alchemist at B&S.
    Last edited by RobertP; 05-18-2008 at 06:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #45

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    Old mill Rising Stonehenge

    Quote Originally Posted by pschwart View Post
    Rising Stonehenge white was one of the first papers I used and there is a lot to like: very inexpensive, great wet strength, not too creamy, one side smooth the other with a bit more texture. But ... I find it grainy compared to Platine, with more contrast that has to be tamed with it's own curve.
    What specific variety of Stonehenge are you referring to? I've recently started using the vellum finish Rising Stonehenge out of the original mill and I cannot discern any difference in the smoothness on either side as you describe. Another interesting fact with this batch, the label says buffered so I soaked some sheets in a 2% oxalic acid solution and I observed none of the tine bubbles on the surface of the paper that are evidence of the buffering agents being neutralized and releasing carbon dioxide gas. I coated both the treated and untreated paper and there was no difference. This paper coats nicely with no treatment.

  6. #46
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    Common report, at least in France, about Arches Platine (french product) was that production stopped about a year ago.
    After some phone calls I found that's not true. Just Canson doesn't present it anymore. Production is still alive.
    Just tell your usual reseller to get in touch with Véronique GOUADER (veronique.gouader@antalis.fr) from Antalis in Paris new representative for that paper.
    Hope it will help.

  7. #47

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    One paper, not yet mentioned, for pt/pd is Whatman #140 HP. Get wet strength and dmax with no 'pretreating' required. Hard to find in North America. I had bought mine from the U.K.

    Roger...

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogein View Post
    One paper, not yet mentioned, for pt/pd is Whatman #140 HP. Get wet strength and dmax with no 'pretreating' required. Hard to find in North America. I had bought mine from the U.K.

    Roger...
    According to New York Central, all Whatman's save the Cold Press 140# are discontinued by the mill. Have you ever seen the CP and if so how rough is it?

    Neal

  9. #49
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Roger, who is your UK source?
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  10. #50

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    The american distributer of Whatman's has the NOT surface (cold press) in their warehouse http://www.daler-rowney.com/
    It's my favorite paper hands down. You need to find an art store who carries daler rowney products and you can have them order it. I used Perl Art. I've also ordered it from the UK
    http://www.artsupplies.co.uk/item.php?item_id=2077

    The not surface has more texture than Rives but less than say Fabriano Cold Press.

    Ike
    Last edited by deisenlord; 06-08-2008 at 03:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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