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  1. #11
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
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    I too sidestep the bleaching and go directly to coffee, but I might try this out anyway. I didn't really take to cyanotypes until I discovered toning in tea and coffee. The toning gives wonderful possibilities.

    Any opinions or results for various kinds of tea?

  2. #12
    Schlapp's Avatar
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    Green is nice as it doesn't stain the paper too much. Easy on the Redbush but I have some Russian tea which does nice things. Have experimented with local natural dyes including lichen [as used in dying wool here at one time] but with not much success [yet]although its a good excuse for a stroll to get some

  3. #13
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    FWIW I really wasn't happy before I started bleaching the prints first. The prints I toned directly just seemed too colored in an overall way to me, and sort of heavy. I have found this process to have a more delicate look.

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    Also, check out the relatively detailed cyanotype toning section of the Christopher James book. Lots of goodies in there.

    My favorite that I have discovered myself is Ilford Multigrade paper developer. Replaces all the blue with a light tan and leaves the whites white. I have tried various dilutions, including straight, and they all have the same effect. I am using Arches watercolor 90# cold press. Can't wait to try this with some suitable subject matter for tan and white...
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Jason,

    I'd be curious to find out what might happen to a print toned with your method if it were put into an acid bath (say 2% citric or acetic acid). Would it turn towards blue again? Do you have a reject you could test?

    Joe

  6. #16
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz View Post
    Jason,

    I'd be curious to find out what might happen to a print toned with your method if it were put into an acid bath (say 2% citric or acetic acid). Would it turn towards blue again? Do you have a reject you could test?

    Joe
    I don't know if it can be re-oxidized after the bleach or not. I can try that next session. I'll report here.

  7. #17
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure it could revert back to blue after the bleach, but I'm wondering if it is inert after the tannin. I've reversed the color after using alkaline bleaches such as borax, ammonia, D-76, etc., so I think washing soda would be similar. But, I've never used tannic acid and so I don't know if that makes it inert.

    Thanks for any update.

    Joe

  8. #18
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz View Post
    I'm pretty sure it could revert back to blue after the bleach, but I'm wondering if it is inert after the tannin. I've reversed the color after using alkaline bleaches such as borax, ammonia, D-76, etc., so I think washing soda would be similar. But, I've never used tannic acid and so I don't know if that makes it inert.

    Thanks for any update.

    Joe
    Now I wonder if the tannin stains, or tans.... it certainly produces a different effect than coffee has for me.

    Now as it's up as an article perhaps a mod could lock this thread and move the discussion there.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    FWIW I really wasn't happy before I started bleaching the prints first. The prints I toned directly just seemed too colored in an overall way to me, and sort of heavy. I have found this process to have a more delicate look.
    thanks for the info, the sample pic looks fantastic for a cyanotype! and I agree my old way does look 'heavy'... more staining than toning. next time i'm at the brewing shop I'll get some tannin...

  10. #20
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    I tried to post this as an article, but for some reason, i can't get it to submit. Perhaps a mod could put it there. I'll give you a dollar....

    Cyanotype is one of the easiest, least expensive, and least hazardous of alt process methods. It is a great way to get your feet wet with alt process. The only downfall is being stuck with a prussian blue image. While some images are wonderful this way, many people wish they could have a different range of tones. That is entirely possible, and what follows is the method I use to tone cyanotypes:

    You start by making a standard cyanotype contact print. I use the Photographers Formulary kit. There are other formulas available, but I have found the kit from PF to work well as any other with this method of toning.
    A small amount of hydrogen peroxide added to the developing water will speed development.

    I have found negatives of average to low contrast and density to work the best with this method. The bullet proof negative tailored to Pt/Pd isn't as well suited, and can tend to block up in the shadows.

    I use a drawing paper called Rapidograph. It holds up well, and it's cheap, but you may prefer something with less texture.

    Once the "blue print" is in hand, you will need the following:

    Sodium Carbonate-(this is available cheaply at many markets as washing soda- I use "Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda" (NOT baking soda!!! That's sodium bicarbonate)

    Tanin-This is cheaply available at brewers supply and is used in winemaking. It works much faster than tea or coffee, and can be mixed to taste.

    I mix all the solutions at the temperature of my tap water, about 60 degrees F.

    Temperature isn't important as long as it is consistent. Alternate warm and cold solutions can cause the paper to reticulate ( crinkle up, and develop "cracks") Also, overly warm solutions seem to make the paper more fragile.

    The toning is done with two baths.

    The first bath is a bleach. I use about one tablespoon of sodium carbonate to a liter. It dissolves better if you mix it into the water. If you add water to it, it has a tendency to cake instead of go into solution.

    The second bath is the toner. I use about one teaspoon of tannin to a liter.

    When the baths are ready, slide the print into the bleach (sodium carbonate solution) bath and gently agitate. The highest values will bleach first. I bleach until the lowest values begin to turn black. You may also see some oranges, purples and tans emerge. This all happens in about thirty seconds to a minute. When it looks almost right I snatch the print and put it in the a wash to stop the action and purge the agent. Don't worry that the very highest values have gone, they will come back to a degree, but don't go to far, either. The amount of bleaching has the greatest effect on the tones of the final image. Less bleaching can sometimes develop split tones, which can be really cool with some prints.

    After the print as washed, you transfer it to the tannin bath, and tone to taste. This process takes the most time. If find twenty minutes with some occasional agitation to suit my tastes. Wash ,dry, press and appreciate.

    Don't bleach or tone more than one print at a time, as contact with other prints can cause splotching, especially in the toning bath.

    Thats it. Really simple.
    hi - this is interesting!
    as you might know, I have done a lot of cyanotypes, and I have bleached/tannin toned many times - but never got this colour...

    mine gets more purple in tone.
    maybe it is the recipie? I don't know the Photographers formulary kit, as I make my own chemistry..

    I don't recommend coffee as a toner (apart from partial toning done with a brush) as it tones the paper too, so the image tends to get very flat..

    tea is good! and there are a LOT of teas around. with quite different "qualities"

    to make an image dark brown, I bleach as you recommend - then rinse and let it tone for about 8 hours or more (image side down), using a tea called "travancore" tea. (Travancore is an area in India I think). this tea has a lot of tannin in it - and it is the one I know, that makes the image most brown..

    bleach alone: bleach the image as you recommend - snatch it before you think it is ready - then let it rinse longer than you'd normally do - the image will keep getting lighter and lighter in the water..
    then dry.
    (best to work with a slightly high contrast neg and then overexpose it so the original tone will be very dark....)

    the fibers in the paper tend to rise when getting wet. - that will make the image slightly difuse to look at.

    however, if you cut a piece of thick card board, slightly bigger than the image, ( make the paper damp) and then put it through an etching press - then you'd have two things happen:
    1: the image field will be pressed, and as a result, the image will look much sharper.
    2: as the pressed area is larger than the image, it will make a kind of framing, wich can look quite beautiful..

    (getting side tracked)

    to get back to the original issue: I'd love to get the tone you have, but but but...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CYAN.jpg  

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