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  1. #1
    Falkenberg's Avatar
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    Salt for saltprinting

    I am aware that normal chemical salt is cheaper than everything on the market, but I am still wondering if anybody have tried to use any of the natural salts on the market. For cooking they give a very different flavour, depending on the type of salt. Are there too many minerals in these types of salts for them to be used in saltprinting ?
    If a man does not keep in step with his fellows it may be because he hears a different drummer... Thoreau

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    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I use either non-iodized salt, kosher salt or sea salt for salt prints. These are listed in my order of preference,
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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    Ole
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    I use simple plain coarse ocean salt (havsalt). Not the fancy gourmet stuff, but the cheap stuff you use for de-icing your front step - or for salting food for preservation.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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    How about salt for the dishwasher?
    kind regards
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    rwyoung's Avatar
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    I've gotten good results with Morten's Kosher Salt, a non-iodine salt. However you may find something just as inexpensive at your local grocery.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

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    Justin Cormack's Avatar
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    I am not sure dishwasher salt doesnt have additives, and here (UK) a lot of salt is "free-flowing" which has additives. But sea salt or pure rock salt will be fine. I use the same salt I use for making bacon, the cheapest coarse sea salt I can find.

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The salt you want for salt printing is Sodium Chloride. Sea salt contains Bromides and Iodides as well, and the other part of the sea salt is calcium, magnesium, potassium and trace minerals besides sodium. There are also carbonates. Commercial salts are made free flowing by the addition of silicates.

    As a result, the papers may work but may vary from batch to batch or stain. The same types of salts mentioned here cannot be used to make an Azo type emulsion as one example, due to their impurity. I have tried!

    BTW, Azo is basically a higher speed example of a salt print, made with purer ingredients and better control.

    PE

  8. #8
    dwross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The salt you want for salt printing is Sodium Chloride. Sea salt contains Bromides and Iodides as well, and the other part of the sea salt is calcium, magnesium, potassium and trace minerals besides sodium. There are also carbonates. Commercial salts are made free flowing by the addition of silicates.

    As a result, the papers may work but may vary from batch to batch or stain. The same types of salts mentioned here cannot be used to make an Azo type emulsion as one example, due to their impurity. I have tried!

    BTW, Azo is basically a higher speed example of a salt print, made with purer ingredients and better control.

    PE
    Actually, I make a lovely warm tone b&w paper with evaporated sea water salt (MASU). Since it comes from the same spot of protected Japanese coral reef (they say, and I've decided to believe) it should be fairly consistent from batch to batch. I think the miniscule amounts of odd chlorides is an advantage (at least in emulsion making). Unfortunately, lab grade NaCl is a whole lot cheaper.

    My philosophy is experiment broadly and see for yourself. You never know when magic will happen.

    http://www.thelightfarm.com/Map/Cont...rmHeartRecipe1

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Denise;

    You are right, but I said Azo type paper.

    Also, even in your own work, you may have variations over the long term. OTOH, you may not. In my work, I had problems with sea salt, table salt and Kosher salt.

    PE

  10. #10
    Michael Slade's Avatar
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    I have a 5-gallon bucket of salt taken from the Great Salt Lake at the site of Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty. I haven't made any salt prints with it yet...but it's on the list. Sounds like it may not work the 'best', but it might have an aesthetic quality that could be good. We'll see.
    Michael Slade

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