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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
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    Hey Craig, welcome! I got some old paper left and I am hankering to try your method. I have the booklet already so I will let you know how it goes.....

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    246
    Thanks, Jorge!

    It's great to be here. This site is the freshest breath of air on the internet!

    Viva APUG!!

    I'm glad to hear you are going to give the method a shot. Let me know if you have any questions. I will be more than happy to walk you though any part of the process.


    Come to think of it, I have a bit of a hankering to get into the darkroom myself tonight....

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    270
    Craig...... How's life in The Peg?!?

    I am also a 'curious Canadian'..... I'll give your system a try....

    Cheers Annie

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    246
    The Peg is hot, humid and the temporary home of none other than J-lo and Richard Gere (in town to film a movie).

    As an aside, Richard Gere has a book ("Pilgrim") of pt/pd photos he took in Tibet/Nepal...its not half bad actually.

    If you'd like to try my method, send me your snail mail address and I will send you the booklet.

    Craig

    craig@prairieview.ca

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    State College, PA
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    Craig,

    I am wondering if you can email me the differences in the current process and the one detailed in the booklet. Fred Albright (also at Dick's workshop) and I have been discussing approaches to work with larger paper. He feels confident with 5x7 but struggles with 8x10. I was going through the booklet to get the hang of the process again, and thought there might be some relevant improvements that I should know about.

    One thing that cuases problems for him is the potential for small spots of sticky coating material to foul up the print frame. These will typically be on the edges, so they won't affect the negative you are working on at the time, but they can stick to the glass, and then stick to the next negative you put in the print frame. This can be a problem to say the least. You have to be very agressive about cleanup of leftover coating material on the print, because it won't just dry up or soak in as if it were on typical pt/pd paper.

    Ultimately, if I wish to work with the process, I want to be able to do large prints, and that is going to be the sticking point for me.

    I think we measured 2.3 with the densitometer. Nobody could believe the readings, so Dick recalibrated the X-Rite, and got the same readings. Don't quote me on the numbers specifically, but it was higher than any silver or Azo reading I've ever seen.

    ---Michael

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    246
    Michael,

    There are a couple of things I can suggest.

    First of all I would reccomend using matte surface paper to start with. It is somewhat easier to coat and will ensure a higher rate of success as you learn the technique.

    One adjustment I have made to my own technique is with glossy paper. I now use a squeegee with it too. In my booklet I outline a slightly different finishing touch for glossy paper...brushing until it is just "right" but I have found that it is not very easy to explain so now I reccomend that glossy paper be done in the same way as matte. First coat with the rod, then the brush, then squeegee (make sure it is a plastic squeegee and not rubber. There are some really good "shower" squeegee's out now that work well.

    As for sticky spots on the edges of the coating area, I have not run into this problem. Two things come to mind. Your friend may be using too much tween or two much solution altogether. You are right, one must be very carefull to sop up any remaining puddles or spots of solution. Secondly with larger sized prints, the paper itself can be the problem in that it will "pop" and "snap" as it were while the rod or brush is being used. In other words as you pass by an area where the paper is perhaps raised a bit from the glass, the paper will be pushed down flat only to then spring back up slightly popping a bit of solution in the air which then lands back down on the print as a spot. You could also consider using a piece of thin mylar to be placed between the coated paper and the negative...something I do when I make Ziatypes on cotton paper. Also make sure you have plenty of paper towels handy. When you make that final pass with the squeegee there will be a line of solution remaining at the end of the run. Make sure to really sop it up with the paper towel.

    For large prints you need to find a way to keep the paper really flat. I have used a vaccuum easle with success for larger prints. I have also used a small jig of acrylic that was sort of like a contact printing frame with a window cut in the glass a bit larger thant the coating area. It held the paper down fairly well.

    I guess one of the most important things to keep in mind is something I elude to in the book. If you have been coating cotton papers for a while, you get used to pussy-footing around (for lack of a better term). The paper is handled very, very gently and sometimes coaxed into working by sweet talk and prayer. Baryta paper is TOUGH. The coating proceedure can be much more agressive than with cotton paper. Both the rod and brush can be passed over the paper many, many times until the solutions is almost dry (ALMOST, don't go until it is dry...you'll get streaks). You can really hit the paper hard with the dryer as well. Just give the solutions a minute or two to soak in after the squeegee step and then blast away with a hair dryer (if you are doing cyano or Van dyke...use cool air from the dryer) Also any spot or stubborn area outside of the image area can be wiped with a paper towel.

    Finally, to really get good at coating large sizes, you should start with Van Dyke Brown. For pennies a print you can dial in a personal method that will transpose to pt/pd with ease later on down the road.

    Craig

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    State College, PA
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    Craig,

    Thanks for the thoughts. I'll pass them on the Fred, and also begin to apply them in my own use.

    ---Michael

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    270
    This is all such good information..... I had slight problems with 'foaming' in my 'experiments' when trying to get the Kodak emulsion to accept liquids.. Is the problem with the resins in the emulsion layer of the paper? Anyway, I managed to locate a retired PhD Chemist that was senior technical associate of Kodak for many years .....one of his specialities is emulsions. Perhaps he will respond to my e-mail and have some insights. Craig, thanks for your informative postings, I look forward to reading your booklet.

    Annie

  9. #19
    photo8x10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Prato- Tuscany - Italy
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    Hi Craig, I've just read your post here....it's fantastic...
    I love printing in platinum/palladium but I don't like very much the papers for it, I like glossy paper, so I would like to know well your method.
    In your post you said about a booklet, How can receive it?

    Best,

    Stefano Germi
    Photo8x10
    Italy

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Shooter
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    Me too, since I already work with fixed out paper for carbon.

    Steve
    The soul never thinks without an image.
    - Aristotle

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