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  1. #21
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Even coatings are not required since one exposes downward through the gelatin -- how much unexposed gelatin is under the exposed gelatin does not matter (as long as there is some unexposed gelatin).

    I tried using .007" film stock a long time ago. I had trouble getting good contact in the printing frame -- the support was too stiff. But more pressure (or a vacuum frame) might allow it to work.

    Coat as large of a tisse as you can -- then once it is dry, cut it down to the sizes you need.

    Your coating method #2 is the one I use -- I like getting my finger into the black glop!

    If you see a polar bear in Poland, he'll probably have some Yupo in his backpack.

    Have fun!

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #22
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    I haven't done carbon printing, but have used liquid photo emulsion with similar issues. One solution is to pre-soak the paper and use watercolor tape to tape it down and leave it to dry before coating it. It will give you perfectly flat coated papers, however you must be able to safely (in the dark) dry these taped down coated papers.

    For that, I have devised a light tight coated paper drying box based on a developer tray, which I have described in full here:

    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_te...rdryingbox.htm

    Have a look, it might be of help.

  3. #23
    q_x
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    Vaughn - thanks for feedback. Actually using "waterproof" supports seems to be worth experimenting. I will be testing glass today once more. Crossing my fingers.

    Marco - I know the method. I've been doing *lots* of graphics (mostly aquatint) drying paper like this. We also used wood glue (looking like high-fat cream) with some water and newspapers paper or some drafts, sketches or paper scraps to glue and dry wet prints (in place of the watercolour tape - it is hard to get it and it is not cheap). Only problem I see here is drying paper after soaking in dichromate - I don't want to have dichromate-soaked wood in the place I will be living. But this is a minor issue.
    Carbon printing is the cheap way for me, and this is all this noise for.
    I've seen the drying cabinet. Nice and inspiring

    Thanks
    Last edited by q_x; 07-18-2008 at 10:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  4. #24
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Drying does take a little longer with waterproof supports -- but they usually are reusable. Carbon printing is only expensive in relation to one's time...but you get what you pay for with your time! good luck!

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #25

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    If you have not already seen it have a look at my article on carbon printing here, http://www.alternativephotography.co...es/art110.html

    The method I use for coating is very efficient, and is only marginally more complicated than just pouring the glop on the paper and evening it by hand. But it gives a much smoother tissue, one with no bubbles or surface debris, assuming you dry in clean dust free room

    Plastic supports (RC papers, film, Yupo) are much better than paper in my opinion because papers sometimes contain chemicals that interfere with the carbon process in one way or another. However, whatever you use be sure to flatten the carbon tissue as soon as it is dry. If you just leave it open to the air the tissue on any support, paper or plastic, will continue to dry out and develop a very severe curve that will make it very difficult to use.

    Sandy King



    Quote Originally Posted by q_x View Post
    Vaughn - thanks for feedback. Actually using "waterproof" supports seems to be worth experimenting. I will be testing glass today once more. Crossing my fingers.

    Marco - I know the method. I've been doing *lots* of graphics (mostly aquatint) drying paper like this. We also used wood glue (looking like high-fat cream) with some water and newspapers paper or some drafts, sketches or paper scraps to glue and dry wet prints (in place of the watercolour tape - it is hard to get it and it is not cheap). Only problem I see here is drying paper after soaking in dichromate - I don't want to have dichromate-soaked wood in the place I will be living. But this is a minor issue.
    Carbon printing is the cheap way for me, and this is all this noise for.
    I've seen the drying cabinet. Nice and inspiring

    Thanks
    Last edited by sanking; 07-20-2008 at 10:41 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
    q_x
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    Hi Vaughn! That is all this noise about

    Hi Sandy!
    Thanks for supporting me. Yes, I've read the article. I'll try as many non-paper materials as I can get.
    For the moment glass work best for me. I have single 2mm thick a3 sheet since 5 years (to cut on it), so it looks glass will last almost forever when treated sincerely.

    Cheers
    Use the Force, Luke!

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