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  1. #21
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Jan, you and Tim can steal my thread any time you like. It will just cost both of you guys some of your fine prints!! Tim, the toning book is a work of art. Jan I was at Freestyle again..... love your work!

    Jim

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fitzgerald View Post
    Jan, you and Tim can steal my thread any time you like. It will just cost both of you guys some of your fine prints!! Tim, the toning book is a work of art. Jan I was at Freestyle again..... love your work!

    Jim
    Thank you Jim :-)
    I didn't mean to steal your thread. I'm sorry :-)
    Tim

  3. #23
    Jim Graves's Avatar
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    Glass or Plastic for alt. proc. contact printer

    I recently got a really good deal on a very nice 11x14 contact printing frame ... of course, when it arrived, the glass was shattered. I've heard that regular window glass, as well as being pretty thin, filters a high % of UV.

    Any suggestions on glass type or plastic alternative to fix it? Thanks

  4. #24

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    Jim,
    There is a thread in the Contact Printing section that has a great deal of information on the type of glass suitable for contact printing. http://www.apug.org/forums/forum55/5...ame-glass.html

    With regard to using plastic, personally I would not recommend it for the reason that it is liable to buckle under the changes of temerature of the printing light. Although this will of course depend on the wattage of your lamp(s) and the duration under your light source. Plastic also scratches easily and is prone to static charge which could attract more dust etc.

    Good luck,
    Trevor.

  5. #25
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Also, many plastics have a built-in UV blocker to prevent them from yellowing with exposure to the sun. So they're even more likely to absorb the needed UV for your process.

  6. #26
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Threads merged, but I've left a redirect that will hang around for a year in the Alt-Process forum.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #27

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    Along the lines of keeping things simple...

    I have a fancy purpose-built contact printing frame and glass now, but when I started doing alt processes, I used a clip picture frame from IKEA and some masking tape. In the US, they're about $3. That glass worked perfectly for cyanotype and van dyke with a pretty wimpy UV lightbox.

    It's pretty easy to cut glass, by the way, with a glass cutter. I know it seems scary, but it's not actually too bad.

    Hope the IKEA clip frame idea helps someone... you can't beat the prices!

  8. #28
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Graves View Post
    I recently got a really good deal on a very nice 11x14 contact printing frame ... of course, when it arrived, the glass was shattered. I've heard that regular window glass, as well as being pretty thin, filters a high % of UV.

    Any suggestions on glass type or plastic alternative to fix it? Thanks
    KISS...window glass from a glass shop. Either single or double strength. The green in the glass won't cause any problems at all. Okay, maybe it will increase your UV exposures by 2% over perfectly colorless glass. (Just a wildass guess).

    Have the edges sanded by the shop. This will make sure that one does not cut one's fingers...but it also will make the glass a lot "stronger" and less likely to break. What it does is prevent the glass from spliting from the edges...like hemming the edges on one's darkcloth prevents it from frilling.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #29
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I got some standard glass from Lowes here in town. Works fine for my carbon printing. Some exposures have been 45 minutes and no problem

    Jim

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