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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Austin, TX
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    Hi All,

    first post here. I am interested in doing some Cyanotype prints and would like to build a Printing Frame for this purpose. I know these can be bought from places like Bostick & Sullivan but as I have a garage full of tools I'd like to go ahead and try to build my own. One issue though - - I've never really seen one in person :-)

    Can anyone point me in the direction of some online plans or a description of what is required for a nice and stable frame?

    thanks for any leads or solutions provided!!

    Delano

  2. #2
    bmac's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    I recently built one. I will attach a jpg of my plans to the non gallery photos.
    hi!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Brian,

    thanks so much for taking the time to upload the graphic. Just to make sure I understand it - - i'm assuming the 1/8" kerf off the rabbet is for the steel frame lock? Glass and Back sit in that 1/2" rabbet?

    thanks again!

    Delano

    PS - where did you pick up spring steel?

  4. #4
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  5. #5
    bmac's Avatar
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    That is correct. I got the steel at Home Depot, was like $7 for enough for two locks on the back.
    hi!

  6. #6

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    Dec 2002
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    The only comment that I would add to this is that I noticed that Brian had identified the drawings of this frame to be suitable for ULF. I don't believe that will work. At least the results will not be as sharp as possible. Normally in ULF work a vacuum frame is used.

    The reason that I know this is that I went through all of the questioning and searching awhile back for my own purposes. Jorge, Sandy, and others all related that for the large negatives and good results a vacuum frame was required. I trusted their judgement in this matter.

    I would not try to contact print 8X10 prints with just a sheet of glass placed on the negative and paper. The contact between negative and paper would not be good enough to achieve maximum sharpness. I sometimes use a sheet of glass on 4X6 for masks and the results can be unsharp (unintentionally) when I do it this way.

    I do use a conventional spring back frame when I have a limited number of 8X10 prints to do.

  7. #7
    Aggie's Avatar
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  8. #8
    bmac's Avatar
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    The wood back / spring locks / padding on the wood (I used automotive headliner) all work together to create a presure that will make the neg to paper sharp (sharp enough for my bad eyes at least. Glass and gravity don't even compare.
    hi!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmac
    The wood back / spring locks / padding on the wood (I used automotive headliner) all work together to create a presure that will make the neg to paper sharp (sharp enough for my bad eyes at least. Glass and gravity don't even compare.
    Brian, your comment about glass and gravity as opposed to spring tension is accurate in my experience. The same principle applies to spring tension as compared to the pressure exerted in a vacuum frame when one works with larger negatives and paper. Prior to buying a vacuum frame, I encountered not one person that told me that spring back frames equalled vacuum frames when one moved into ULF negatives. Had I found someone that shared a contrary experience with me then I would not have spent the money on the pump and frame. My experience with the vacuum frame has supported and reinforced what I was told.

    As I have related earlier I do use a 8X10 spring back frame when I do a limited number of prints of that size.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    New Mexico
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    to dnmillikan

    Having to print some big negs 12x20s, and not having the
    money for a vac frame. I built my own using 1x3 maple,
    cutting a top of 1/2in maple and inside guides a 3 part back of 3/4in MDF and 3/8x2in oak for the springs this frame has no problem with sharpness. The glass was 3/16 to 1/4in yes it is heavy but alot easer to work with than the 30x40 vac frame the guy sent me. It still is taking up space in my studio. Frames for big film need to be big

    Jan Pietrzak

    ps I canceled my gym membership

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