Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,928   Posts: 1,522,163   Online: 1023
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Justin Cormack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    181
    Its hard to find second hand frames over 8x10 unfortunately. I have never seen one in the UK though I only look occasionally.

  2. #12
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,234
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    Yes, bigger than 8x10 is tough, especially in good condition. I got lucky once though- I bought a batch of frames on ebay. The lot was described as a handful of 5x7 frames, an 8x10, and an 11x14 or two. I paid $25. When I went to pick it up, I was handed a dozen 5x7 frames, 2 8x10s, 3 11x14s, a 14x17, and a 12x20. A discussion ensued about printing methods, and then I was offered an easel. This is no ordinary easel. An old Kodak easel which can handle 20x25 images with a 5" border. I can barely lift the thing. Then the film holders came pouring out of the storage locker too... 11x14s, 7x11s, 5x7s, 4x5s, and some whole plate stuff too. If I had had a van, and not just a coupe, I would have bought all his Omega enlargers off of him as well... he had three Omega 4x5 enlargers with dichroic heads.

    Point being, folks still have these treasure troves stashed away in basements places, and sometimes they'll unload them on you when they detect a friendly face.

  3. #13
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,778
    Images
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Yes, bigger than 8x10 is tough, especially in good condition. I got lucky once though- I bought a batch of frames on ebay. The lot was described as a handful of 5x7 frames, an 8x10, and an 11x14 or two. I paid $25. When I went to pick it up, I was handed a dozen 5x7 frames, 2 8x10s, 3 11x14s, a 14x17, and a 12x20. A discussion ensued about printing methods, and then I was offered an easel. This is no ordinary easel. An old Kodak easel which can handle 20x25 images with a 5" border. I can barely lift the thing. Then the film holders came pouring out of the storage locker too... 11x14s, 7x11s, 5x7s, 4x5s, and some whole plate stuff too. If I had had a van, and not just a coupe, I would have bought all his Omega enlargers off of him as well... he had three Omega 4x5 enlargers with dichroic heads.

    Point being, folks still have these treasure troves stashed away in basements places, and sometimes they'll unload them on you when they detect a friendly face.
    Scott, way to go! Nice to get the big contact frames but the 11x14 film holders... now I jealous!!

    Jim

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pakistan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    266
    If costs are an issue, they may be significantly reduced by ordering noble metals separately as single salts from other, non-photographic sources, and preparing the required double salt yourself. You get them, for instance, from precious metal separating works. If you now start for the first time, you might perhaps prefer to get the ready-made stuff, but it is worth asking a company whether they are able to sell this also.


    By the way, my website is currently offline due to a shift of my residence; I apologize for this.

  5. #15
    sly
    sly is online now
    sly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Nanaimo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,346
    Images
    216
    I use a sheet of 16x20 glass scavenged from an "artwork" bought for $1 at a thrift store, and a piece of counter top cut to match picked up at the local re-cycle joint. I bought clamps (new ones!) at the hardware store. Of course I carefully inspected the glass for defects and the chunk of countertop for flatness. The edges of the glass have been taped to prevent cuts, and the edge of the counter sanded. I use a piece of mat board between the counter top and my paper, just in case there are contaminants in the surface. It doesn't allow me to develop by inspection - but as I don't do any DOP, I'm not fussed.
    Watch out for those taxes and duty and all - I once paid 2/3rds of the cost of my item! If it is possible to get something in your country, don't order from some where else!

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cardiff, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    736
    Images
    68
    My cousin is doing a carpentry degree so he's going to knock me something together, pretty much what you just described Sly, the only difference being the glass will have a wooden banding around it and will be hinged to the wooden base. That means I can spend more money on OHP film and paper

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin