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Thread: Cyanotype blues

  1. #31
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth View Post
    I forgot to mention that what you technically start with sodium sulfite is of course a bleaching process, as you would for toning.
    And, as I have said before, I would not use Arches Platine either. The paper looks beautiful, but Arches keeps tinkering with its formula. Over the years, I have run into unexpected differences and bad batches again and again, and this may be quite frustrating.
    My understanding (which could be wrong) is that the sizing used in the paper is changed seasonally due to the temperature at the factory. Appearently, some sizing material is easier to use in the process of making the paper at low temps and some at high temps. Since the different sizing does not affect the use of the paper for its intended purpose (watercolor painting), they don't worry about it.

    The Bergger COT320 is made by Arches to a specific formula...thus in theory, should be more consistant. But only in theory, I'm afraid. I have a "bad" batch of COT320 in 16x20.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    My understanding (which could be wrong) is that the sizing used in the paper is changed seasonally due to the temperature at the factory. Appearently, some sizing material is easier to use in the process of making the paper at low temps and some at high temps. Since the different sizing does not affect the use of the paper for its intended purpose (watercolor painting), they don't worry about it.

    The Bergger COT320 is made by Arches to a specific formula...thus in theory, should be more consistant. But only in theory, I'm afraid. I have a "bad" batch of COT320 in 16x20.

    Vaughn
    I have never heard about this seasonal change of the sizing.
    Arches platine is, however, for all I know not marketed primarily as a water colour paper, but, as the name indicates, for *alternativeprocesses*, foremost, of course, platinum prints. Now pt/pd is a rather easy process, but I have hade difficulties with some batches making pt/pd prints also. I once or twice got my money refunded, but not the hassle. Good batches generally work normally with pt/pd or kallitypes, though. New cyanotypes are more fickle, and here Arches Platine drove me crazy by once working and once not, until I discovered the citric acid precoating method. Chrysotypes also are less easily made on this paper than one might think; as often as not I ended up with some undesirable pattern of patches which only became visible when the paper was dry.

    This Bergger paper is apparently a baryta paper without baryta coating, but cut to photographic sizes. This alone makes it uninteresting for me. I want to print on watercolour for the haptics and the subtle paper tones (I certainly don't need this pure, brilliant white), and tear the paper to sizes I want.

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