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  1. #1
    q_x
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    Lo-tech (or poorman's) techniques

    Hi there!

    I'm gathering the ideas of poorman's photography in the area of light-sensitive materials. When I write "Poorman's" I could also write "DIY-ish", "natural" or "eco".

    So far I've been able to find very few:
    Egg's white is supposed to harden (become insoluble, like gum in bichromate processes) in daylight without sensitizing,
    Extracts from flower petals are bleaching under the sunlight,
    Leaves do the same thing.

    Do you know any other ways to make poorman's photos (this things may be expensive, but should not include industry level chemicals/materials, but rather things you can find or do on your own)?
    Are there any poorman's ways to fix such photos?

    The only two photographical "instruments" are pinhole camera and directly casting shadows (when objects are near paper). I'm feeling this is nearly all.

    Cheers,
    Luke
    Use the Force, Luke!

  2. #2
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    Coffee developers?

  3. #3
    q_x
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    Coffee developers are developing silver salts. Silver salts are not as lo-tech, as I need.
    Also fixing can be made in kitchen salt. Just the medium being developed or fixed is not enough lo-tech.
    One can say "you can do silver gelatin easily". Paper is not lo-tech, gelatin, measuring cups, thermometers, clocks (!) and various salts are also not as lo-tech, as I need.

    I was considering salted paper, but I can,t see easy way to make silver salt pure and easy enough.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  4. #4
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Tape a negative to a leaf on a tree in direct sunlight. Leave it for a while then try to find a way to fix the image.



    Steve.

  5. #5
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    You can use either the method Steve mentioned, info here http://www.alternativephotography.co...es/art119.html or you could try the anthotype process http://www.alternativephotography.co...anthotype.html. If you don't want to use a film negative you could make photograms.

    Best,

    John.
    ~John~
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    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  6. #6
    q_x
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    I know the things you've mentioned.

    I've found a book from 1849 (?), the flower petal tinctures were described there. Quite old technique.

    And bichromate solution after exposing will also make an grey-green image (not washable, but pale).

    I have not checked the egg properties and hopefully I'll try this in summer. Now we have almost no sun here. I'm feeling it's close to the North Pole from here, this winter seems to be endless.

    Cheers,
    Luke
    Use the Force, Luke!

  7. #7
    Marco B's Avatar
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    In terms of actual possible process description, I think the Alternative Photography website already mentioned can't be beat. However, for getting some ideas and historic background, you might also wish to look at the book listed here:

    PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE 19th CENTURY:
    A Process Identification Guide

    by William E. Leyshon

    A direct link to a full PDF version of the book can be found in the Links section of APUG here:
    http://www.apug.org/portal/?id_category=93

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  8. #8
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    If it was not for the Ammonium or Potassium dichromate, carbon printing would fit the bill...Knox Unflavoured Gelatin and some sugar from the supermarket, with some ink or watercolor paint tossed in. Transfer the final image to some fixed-out photo paper that was too old (fogged) to print with.

    Whoops, I guess one has to have fixer then. One could use any paper that one has coated with gelatin (but hardened, so that takes more chemicals).

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #9
    q_x
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    Thanks for pointing the book, Marco
    Vaughn, I know the carbon process pretty much, it will be very good. Thanks.
    Use the Force, Luke!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco B View Post
    In terms
    PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE 19th CENTURY:
    A Process Identification Guide

    by William E. Leyshon

    A direct link to a full PDF version of the book can be found in the Links section of APUG here:
    http://www.apug.org/portal/?id_category=93

    Marco
    wow that's a great PDF to have, full of good info

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