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  1. #51
    scootermm's Avatar
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    FC and Jarv, I think you are just having a misinterpretation of wording.
    Na2, technically IS Platinum or at least could presumably be referred to as Platinum sinces its Sodium Chloroplatinate. Just a different version of Platinum then the older ratio method of Pd to Pt.

    (In Bostick&Sullivan terms) if you are doing the traditional palladium #3 and Platinum #3 method of contrast, you shouldnt use Na2 in addition to Pd#3 and Pt#3. Na2 should be used purely with Pd#3 and no Pt#3.
    Nigel Tufnel: It's like, how much more black could this be? and the answer is none.
    None more black.

  2. #52
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    Jarv-

    Therein lies the confusion. Platinum is Potassium Chloroplatinite. Na2 is Sodium Platinum. Check the labels on your bottles to verify - there may be a typo on the B&S webpage. If you use Palladium (Sodium Chloropalladite) with Platinum (Potassium Chloroplatinite) to achieve a "platinum" look, then adding NA2 (Sodium Platinum) into the mix will be a waste of NA2. All it will do is retard your highlights, without affecting contrast.

  3. #53
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    is there an echo?
    Nigel Tufnel: It's like, how much more black could this be? and the answer is none.
    None more black.

  4. #54
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    No, Matt - I was typing my response while you were typing yours. Yours just came out first.

  5. #55

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    Here's what you do:

    Work only with the palladium at first with your test strips, equal amounts FO and Pd.

    Find your optimum exposure where at least 2-3 sections of the step wedge are pure black and indistinguishable from each other.

    Then look at your highlight portion. Is it paper white? Or dull?

    If dull, try just a drop of 2.5% NA2...a little goes a long way so take that into consideration if you're doing small test strips and not a print.

    There's more, but that's all I have time for now...read the Arentz book...twice...and read it again.

  6. #56

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    Things are starting to look up I think. It was down to my shoddy coating, I was spreading it too thin over too large an area and losing too much on the brush which is why I was getting weak blacks. They're looking full and beefy now. Need to stick with the rod and practice coating. Last thing is a decent neg, how I yearn for an 8x10 instead of this inkjet crap. Oh, and a pile of books like you suggest PV!

  7. #57

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    Jarvman, not sure which brush you are using - Richeson 9010, I hope. If so, let it sit in some Di water for a bit, then when you are ready to coat give it a quick flick, turn flick until you make a full rotation. You will not be leaving much coating material at all - Scootermm has a real nice pdf on the process here that might be of some help. If you want to stay with the rod, that works as well - I did not take to rod coating, but that was me.

    In addition to the Arentz book (and I go to it all the time just to refresh what I think I know) the Sullivan & Weese "The New Platinum Print" book is another good reference. It is out of print I think but copies can still be found used. Be sure to watch the drop counts, I started out using less than I needed, but would up the count a bit to find the right place - also, some paper needs more, other paper less - I use between 36-40 drops (FO+Pd) for my 8x10's as an example.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  8. #58

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    The ETDA aint so good at clearing the platine. Would you suggest using hydrochloric acid? If so what strength and dilution?

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarvman View Post
    The ETDA aint so good at clearing the platine. Would you suggest using hydrochloric acid? If so what strength and dilution?
    For Platine use Kodak Hypo Clearing Agent it works well.
    Platinum Printing Editions http://www.dceditions.com
    The Art of Platinum Printing Blog http://artofplatinum.wordpress.com/
    Alternative Photographic Processes blog http://altphotoblog.com/

  10. #60

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    Ah ok, cheers Dave

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