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  1. #1

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    Couple o platinum questions

    I was lucky enough to be able to visit 31 Studio platinum printroom yesterday, they said that the developer has the greatest influence on the tone in the print rather than the ratio of pt to pd. I have ammonium citrate which produces cool tones with arches platine and apparently the opposite with aquarelle. Considering I would like a warm tone to my prints it was suggested that heating up the developer could make a difference. Would the ammonium citrate heated to 40 degrees, the highest my water bath will go yield a warmer print. Also, I was looking at the prints they made of Coburn's work which im sure they referred to as gumover but a mention of vandyke brown also came up when talking about them, whats the difference in the processes? Thanking you kindly!

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Straight Palladium will give you a much warmer tone than any pt/pd mix. For my own use, I prefer the Potassium Oxalate developer, which does shift image tone when heated, but it is not as dramatic a shift as excluding platinum from the emulsion.

  3. #3
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    Metal content, developer (and temp of the dev), and paper all come into play in the final print color.

    Van Dyke is a silver process...brushed on the paper in the same manner as Pt/pd printing. They can be toned with platinum to give a look that is much like platinum/palladium prints.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #4
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Also in my experience with Potassium Oxalate the age of the developer affects color.
    With a brand new batch of developer heated and using Palladium I get pretty warm prints. After a couple years seasoning with Pt/Pd mixtures it won't change color much regardless of temp.
    Dennis

  5. #5

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    I have found potassium Oxalate to be much warmer than the other developers, especially when heated. I heat to 125, or "low" on my walmart hot plate.

  6. #6
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    Also in my experience with Potassium Oxalate the age of the developer affects color.
    With a brand new batch of developer heated and using Palladium I get pretty warm prints. After a couple years seasoning with Pt/Pd mixtures it won't change color much regardless of temp.
    Dennis
    Dennis, with old well-used developer, does the development temp still affect the "speed" of the paper (ie, increase temp -- decrease exposure time under the UV) ?

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #7
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    If it does it isn't much. Occasionally I will forget to put the developer back into the heater and it gets cool in the tray and I process anyway and it doesn't seem to make any difference. I think my heating the developer becomes part superstition after awhile. My developer gets really old because when I heat it I am usually careful to pour it right back in the bottle and cap it so it doesn't evaporate between prints. Then when my volume starts to get low I add fresh developer to the old.

  8. #8

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    Here's a formula for a developer that gives warm tones at room temperature:

    180g Potassium Oxalate
    60g Potassium Phosphate monobasic
    1000ml Water

    From Ted Rice's book "Palladium Printing Made Easy".

  9. #9

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    Oh aye, one more question, If I want to have straight borders what tape do I use to mask the edges of the print area? Obviously something archival which doesn't allow the solution to bleed into the paper yes? What specifically though

  10. #10
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Actually you don't tape. You mask with Rubylith (graphic arts film) during exposure. Rubylith completely blocks UV transmission. Then the area outside the borders of the negative is never exposed, so it disappears in the clearing bath.

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