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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    X-ray film anyone?

    Has anyone here ever used x-ray film in an 8x10 camera? I found this place (http://www.med1online.com/p-2724-kon...m-pg01508.aspx) where you can get 100 sheets of 8x10 film for like $40. The question is, what does x-ray film look like when exposed to light and processed normally? The same? Extended sensitivity to X-rays in an fashion like IR film?

  2. #2

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    X-ray film is blue sensitive, some is also green sensitive, therefore you get a tonal distortion of your scene, which can look quite vintage. Most x-ray film has emulsion on both sides, so there are issues with scratching and only one side will be in the absolute plane of focus of the lens. I have successfully used X-ray film as camera film, and there are people who make quite lovely images with it..but it is different. Exposure and development will have to be trial and error until you find your sweet spot with it. But, the good thing is that it is cheap. Also, X-ray film is on a blue base, which may, or may not interfere with your method of printing.

  3. #3

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    PhotoBulley uses xray film often.
    im empty, good luck

  4. #4

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    I seem to recall someone said it was also quite slow when used pictorially - something like ISO 10 or less. But I could be wrong on that.
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

    - phirehouse, after buying a camera in the classifieds

  5. #5
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    I've tried it and will try again, but I haven't put the time into it to get really comfortable. I found the particular (green sensitive) version I tried to be about ASA 25 in incandescent light and about ASA 200 outdoors in winter. More experimentation is clearly needed.
    As to the issue of it being coated on each side: what is known as "extremity film" to x-ray techs I've asked, or mammogram film on the websites, is emulsion coated on only one side - for more detail. It is more expensive, but not as expensive as regular 8x10 film. I haven't tried it yet.

  6. #6

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    X-ray film may also be coated on both sides. Most sheets I've seen have rounded corners. I've seen some interesting results from using x-ray film as a printing medium, backing it with white board about a centimeter behind the film. The double image (one on each side of the base) produces some interesting effects. I haven't seen any results from camera use. You might survey the products available an choose a likely one for some experiments, though.

  7. #7

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    The thing about X-ray film is that by comparison to conventional camera film, it is dirt cheap. 100 sheet 8x10 box for under $40.

  8. #8

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    Make friends with a radiologist and get expired film for free. Well, that's my plan anyway. : )

  9. #9

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    A popular misconception about x-ray film is that it is primarily sensitive to x-rays. That's not the case. The film holders contain phosphor coated screens which emit blue or green light when exposed to x-rays. The film is held in close contact with the screen, and it is the light from the glowing phosphors that make the bulk of the exposure. Green sensitive films are used in conjuntion with screens using green emitting phosphors and blue sensitive films get used with blue emitting screens. X-ray film comes in different sensitivities for different applications. Some are faster than others. It does not surprise me that under incandescent light, which is sorely lacking in the blue/green spectrum, would be very slow. The dramatic speed increase under daylight is also not surprising. It is good to know that there are some films that are coated only on one side. I imagine these would be best for pictorial use. The support of these films is thicker than pictorial films because they must be sturdy enough to withstand rough handling. Double coated films would have one side considerably off register, and consequently out of focus.
    Frank Schifano

  10. #10
    DeBone 75's Avatar
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    "Double coated films would have one side considerably off register, and consequently out of focus."
    In general this is so not true. All I ever use in my 8X10 is green X-ray film and it is usally tack sharp. Also it can be bought for less than $27.00. per 100 sheet box.
    Leslie D. Wall
    AKA DeBone75

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