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  1. #11
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deisenlord View Post
    I've made up wax with bleached beeswax and damar resin, supposedly this is what the old-timers used. Works well but the Reniassance Wax Kerik mentions was supposedly developed to replace this concoction by the British museum.
    Ike
    I'm interested. I have an old booklet from the British Museum about the preservation of leather covered books, and in it there is a recipe for a wax that they used on leather. I'll dig it up and see what I can find. Might it be the same wax? I wonder.

  2. #12
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    Might it be the same wax? I wonder.
    Found it, miraculously. For a while I feared that I might have put it somewhere so I wouldn't lose it, in which case i might not be able to retrieve it for several years.

    I doubt the formula is the right one. It contains lanolin, cederwood oil, beeswax and heptane. Wouldn't work on prints, I think. I'm sure it would be great where penetration is needed.

  3. #13
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik View Post
    1) Reniassance Wax
    2) Wax On
    3) Wax Off
    What Kerik said. Also looks gorgeous when applied to pt/pd prints made on vellum such as on this image:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremymoore/3265084346/
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
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  4. #14

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    Giving some sheen or shine to pt/pd prints seems to be the Holy Grail for some folks. I have tried all of the methods mentioned so far and none of them make enough difference to justify the trouble IMO. If you want shine, just put the prints in a frame behind glass and you will get plenty of it!!

    Sandy

  5. #15
    Don12x20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Giving some sheen or shine to pt/pd prints seems to be the Holy Grail for some folks. I have tried all of the methods mentioned so far and none of them make enough difference to justify the trouble IMO. If you want shine, just put the prints in a frame behind glass and you will get plenty of it!!

    Sandy

    Although I don't see the smilely faces, I can only presume you are joking Sandy (although I agree - I've tried it and the difference in dmax isn't worth the bother to me. As Arentz says - you'll never achieve the high dmaxs of a silver paper, so get used to it or switch to silver. Let the eye be fooled into accepting the dmax on Pt/Pd that you do achieve)

    They're not trying to make a shine, but change the surface characteristics. By changing the surface from a diffuse matte to something less difuse, they are going to achieve higher dmax. Its there on the paper already, you just can't see it.

    This effect was well know in even Silver paper -- you could get a higher dmax out of glossy paper compared to the exact same emulsion in a matte or semi-matte surface (pearl, etc back in the days when Kodak offered the same paper with different surfaces).

    this will work with most alt processes where the wax and solvents don't change the image chemically.

    On the subject of which wax:
    Sexton has used Renaissance wax for years on his already-glossy prints, particularly on his teaching prints (although his purpose is to extend the life of his teaching materials: to repair the minor abrasions that happen). So Renassance wax, with its microcrystalline structure should work similarly with Pt or Pd.

  6. #16

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    Hi Sandy.

    Well, I have to disagree; my usage of Hydrocote Polyshield Clear Polyurethane exterior wood finish definitely adds sheen and most importantly dmax to prints -> and that's a considerable amnt. of dmax increase; at least a stop / visually... (BTW, I particularly don't care for the sheen -> but you have to have it if you need higher dmax, just like someone else described just before me.) The added bonus is to able to present the print w/o glazing; which is a much better experience. The wood finish perfectly seals the print surface rendering it impermeable - equally for gases and liquids. You can just wipe the surface with a moistened tissue when it gets dusty/dirty. Pretty practical.

    Regards,
    Loris.


    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    Giving some sheen or shine to pt/pd prints seems to be the Holy Grail for some folks. I have tried all of the methods mentioned so far and none of them make enough difference to justify the trouble IMO. If you want shine, just put the prints in a frame behind glass and you will get plenty of it!!

    Sandy

  7. #17
    Don12x20's Avatar
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    Loris
    Is the print brittle in this configuration? (hard gloss coat, which I presume to be a thin layer, on top of the print). Do you see much breakage on this thin sandwich, which I presume to be pretty rigid.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by nawagi View Post
    Place a chunk of bleached beeswax the size of a quarter on a plate. Heat in microwave until partially melted (some liquid and some soft wax). Remove and add 2 - 3 drops of lavender oil and mix into a creamy goo. Make a 2 small buffing pads out of a well-washed flannel shirt. Dip one pad into the waxy creme and apply to your print in a circular motion. Allow to set for a minute, then use the other pad to buff it out in a straight line motion. Never did this in plats. but it makes my salt prints DMax much deeper.

    NWG
    This sounds like the most dedicated process for sure, it has that kind of 'ooh wow' gravitas of starting with basic ingredients and cooking it all up (next up is to search up on how to extract oil from lavender) ... in the meantime I have ordered some Renaissance Wax through a local swordsmith who calls himself 'wargod' (Hayden to his mom).

    Should be interesting

    from his site:
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  9. #19
    clay's Avatar
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    If you print on vellum, you can dmax values approaching silver. I have a print made on Clearprint Vellum that has two layers of wax applied and buffed into it that has a measured dmax of 1.85. It helps to drymount the vellum print to a heavier sheet of paper before going to town with the wax.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  10. #20

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    It isn't. You can bend / handle the print as you wish w/o any cracking and such... The dried finishing layer isn't that much thick - maybe slightly thicker than a sizing layer, and that's perfectly enough to diminish unnecessary reflections (which lowers dmax and contrast).

    Regards,
    Loris.


    Quote Originally Posted by Don12x20 View Post
    Loris
    Is the print brittle in this configuration? (hard gloss coat, which I presume to be a thin layer, on top of the print). Do you see much breakage on this thin sandwich, which I presume to be pretty rigid.

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