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  1. #21

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    Indeed, when I print on Masa paper (Japanese drawing paper - weight something like 80-90 gsm), the prints definitely look darker compared to others on say... COT 320 or Fabriano Artistico. The added bonus of Masa is to be able to put something colored behind, in order to manipulate the base hue between cool and warm. (Which has a considerable effect on the print...) The down side is -> working with Masa isn't easy because of its thinness.

    Regards,
    Loris.


    Quote Originally Posted by clay View Post
    If you print on vellum, you can dmax values approaching silver. I have a print made on Clearprint Vellum that has two layers of wax applied and buffed into it that has a measured dmax of 1.85. It helps to drymount the vellum print to a heavier sheet of paper before going to town with the wax.
    Last edited by Loris Medici; 04-09-2009 at 04:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    What Kerik said. Also looks gorgeous when applied to pt/pd prints made on vellum such as on this image:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremymoore/3265084346/
    What's the trick to applying the wax without getting the noticeable swirl marks or lines from the wax? I could never get a nice completely smooth coat.

  3. #23
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    Warm wax in multiple thin coats. Also use old T-shirt material for buffing.
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by clay View Post
    Warm wax in multiple thin coats. Also use old T-shirt material for buffing.
    Clay, So is the heated wax applied with a soft cloth in circular motions? Or can the wax be heated to liquid form and then applied with a puddle pusher in one sweeping motion much like a layer of gum is applied? Thanks

  5. #25

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    Application of gum (arabic?) with puddle pusher / glass rod!?

    It's the first time I hear something like that! Do you actually coat gum that way or was that a slip of the tongue? If you actually coat gum with a puddle pusher, I'd like to hear about your procedure -> sounds very interesting!

    Thanks,
    Loris.

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    ...applied with a puddle pusher in one sweeping motion much like a layer of gum is applied?

  6. #26
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    Loris, Sorry, What I should have said was applying like you would the gelatin sizing. The step prior to applying the gum with a roller. Its obvious I don't do many gum overs.

  7. #27

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    I've found a good way to remove swirls was by buffing with a shoe brush....

  8. #28
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    I just make sure it is warm enough not to glop and ball up when I smooth it on with the t-shirt material. I tried using molten wax one time and it just sort of went straight through the paper. I am sure with some experimentation on old prints a way could be found to make this work with liquid wax. Then you could call them platino-encaustic prints. Hell, if you can smear wax on an inkjet print and call it an encaustic print, this would be no big deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertP View Post
    Clay, So is the heated wax applied with a soft cloth in circular motions? Or can the wax be heated to liquid form and then applied with a puddle pusher in one sweeping motion much like a layer of gum is applied? Thanks
    I just want to feel nostalgic like I used to.


    http://www.clayharmon.net - turnip extraordinaire

  9. #29
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    I'm wondering if warming it a little with a hair dryer may help in smoothing out the wax marks? I need to experiment a little more with it. I tried it once and I'm sure I put it on a little to thick ( swirl mark city). I then tried it with the wax warmed and almost liquid and it seemed I damaged the fibers of the paper by buffing it. Thanks

  10. #30

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    Well no, I was not kidding. I tried several things to increase sheen of pt/pd prints and while some of them added a bit of Dmax the look after treatment was less appealing to me than before treatment. Like I said, just not worth the trouble IMO.

    Sandy







    Quote Originally Posted by Don12x20 View Post
    Although I don't see the smilely faces, I can only presume you are joking Sandy (although I agree - I've tried it and the difference in dmax isn't worth the bother to me. As Arentz says - you'll never achieve the high dmaxs of a silver paper, so get used to it or switch to silver. Let the eye be fooled into accepting the dmax on Pt/Pd that you do achieve)
    Last edited by sanking; 04-10-2009 at 12:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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