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  1. #11
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Is this really the right place for this topic? I thought it'd be about alternative processes, not silly chemistry/physics... Lounge might be more appropriate...
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akki14 View Post
    Is this really the right place for this topic? I thought it'd be about alternative processes, not silly chemistry/physics... Lounge might be more appropriate...
    I don't know, it sounds highly alternative.
    Coat your paper negative with palladium, use their Superwave (TM) bulbs in your studio lights, and develop the paper in heavy water. Lo and behold, the energy release from the cold fusion burns holes in your paper to form the image!

    Trouble is, we're already all pedophiles and terrorists. You can just imagine the fuss from the nuclear weapons inspectorate if we starting buying or purifying heavy water too!

  3. #13

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    They missed alot

    The broadcast did miss alot . I wanted to hear more about the company they mentioned called Energetics Technologies.
    I checked them out on the web and it turns our it is an American company
    and their work has been replicated by the other 2 labs show in the story.
    Here is is a link to their website.
    www.energeticstechnologies.com

  4. #14
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I guess this means that someone will buy up all the palladium, and artificially inflate the market ala the Hunt brothers did to silver in the 80's, therefore making us dig even deeper into our already empty pockets to practice our art(passion). Maybe we should form a consortium and buy up all the palladium. then as members we would have the only access to it. Ultimately, anyone else wanting it, would have to pay our outragiously inflated price, thus allowing us(the members) to have extra working capital to spend on our PASSION--buying silver at an unbelievably high price.
    Well enough ranting for today -- Every body keep shooting -- the silver market depends on us to stay alive.
    Rick

  5. #15

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    There isn't much work being done on "cold fusion" these days, and it will probably not have any effect on the price of the metal. The original claims were pretty well discredited several years ago, but there are still some important questions (probably in the area of the physical chemistry of hydrogen adsorption by palladium) that need to be answered.

  6. #16
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Cold fusion per Pons and Fleischman is going nowhere. It is a standard joke at any physics conference that I attend; why the chemists decided to give it more press this year is beyond me. I wish them lots of luck with that.

    The real cold fusion is muon catalyzed and is quite well known in the physics community.
    What he said.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley View Post
    It was a farce the first time and its a farce this time. Just another scam to get research money and tenure.
    And what he said.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18

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    I'm not saying that there might not be some actual physics going on in cold fusion, I don't know. But it's certainly no way to a practical or theoretically possible source of energy. In order for two atoms to fuse, you need to overcome the Coulomb potential of the two nuclei. Guess what, that takes energy. To give enough atoms enough energy to fuse, you're going to have to put in a lot of energy. They might not be thermalized, so not technically hot, but they are going to have a lot of energy. So I think the whole idea of a bunch of room temperature deuterium is just magically going to all fuse without a big source of input energy is silly.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    I'm not saying that there might not be some actual physics going on in cold fusion, I don't know. But it's certainly no way to a practical or theoretically possible source of energy. In order for two atoms to fuse, you need to overcome the Coulomb potential of the two nuclei. Guess what, that takes energy. To give enough atoms enough energy to fuse, you're going to have to put in a lot of energy. They might not be thermalized, so not technically hot, but they are going to have a lot of energy. So I think the whole idea of a bunch of room temperature deuterium is just magically going to all fuse without a big source of input energy is silly.
    If you can get two deuterium atoms close enough to fuse, they will give off a lot more energy than it takes to bring them together. But getting them close is not that easy. One of the original conjectures about "cold fusion" was that the palladium environment might allow a very few atoms to come close enough that they could interact by some quantum tunneling mechanism. It might, but probably couldn't, happen. Then there was the problem of neutron release. The "cold fusion" reaction does not release neutrons, but the known D-D reactions do, and neutron release is required by the known physics. Pons an Fleishman postulated that another reaction path was used that did not require neutron release. After all, the basic equations balanced, and such alternative paths are common in chemistry. That explanation was not really satisfactory. But the anomalous energy release in the "cold fusion" process does exist, and it has not been fully explained. The most satisfying conjectures involve lattice relaxation in the palladium ingot under the influence of deuterium adsorption, but the theoretical and experimental work to fully explain what is happening has not been done very fully. This work could be quite valuable in physical chemistry even if "cold fusion" as an energy source doesn't work.

  10. #20

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    I know all about 'hot' fusion. I am aware that you get more energy out then you put in in fusion processes. That's the whole point. My point is that in order to cross that threshold for fusion to happen, your atoms need a lot of energy. Less then you will get out from fusion, but still a lot. My bone to pick is that many people hear cold fusion and think room temperature with no energy input. There will be energy input for fusion to happen. Maybe it comes from big lasers, maybe lattice relaxation, maybe Ohmic heating, but it's coming from somewhere. The cross section for DD fusion is not even on the graphs until 10 keV. Thats 100,000 K. To put things in perspective, the plasma in a fluorescent light is probably somewhere around 11,000 K and it's nowhere near fusing. I'd call that hot, even though it's not really hot for a plasma.

    I agree that there might be an interesting physical process going on in cold fusion. And it might be actually be fusion. But not as an energy source - as you said, 'a very few' atoms. If you want enough atoms participating to make an energy source, you are going to have to give a large population of them a lot of energy.

    If you are fusing DD, you will have either have neutron production (He + n), or tritium production (T + p) - DD fusion doesn't always produce neutrons.

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