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  1. #21
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    For palladium the Stonhenge needs to be dunked in oxalic acid first and then it provides a wonderful print with a very deep black (for me). If you have some stonehenge left over try soaking it in oxalic acid first--coating also seems easier to me when the humidity isn't too low.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  2. #22

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    As best as I can recall I tried an oxalic acid bath on stonehenge also. For Kallitype I have found if the paper is bibulous the oxalic acid does not change that. I do have humidity problems in the winter but I started to humidify the room when the humidity gets low.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    So if you wanted to print negatives with different DR you would have to maintain 2 bottles for each dilution, which seems very tedious.

    Don
    Well, the fact is I maintain about 5-7 bottles for contrast control, ranging from as little as no potassium dichromate added to the developer to as much as 16-24 ml of a 4% potassium dichromate per liter of developer. It is really not so tedious as all, you just need to have space for the bottles, and the developer lasts indefinitely.

    Sandy

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by philsweeney
    As best as I can recall I tried an oxalic acid bath on stonehenge also. For Kallitype I have found if the paper is bibulous the oxalic acid does not change that. I do have humidity problems in the winter but I started to humidify the room when the humidity gets low.
    What is bibulous paper? And is it easy to recognize?

    Sandy

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Well, the fact is I maintain about 5-7 bottles for contrast control, ranging from as little as no potassium dichromate added to the developer to as much as 16-24 ml of a 4% potassium dichromate per liter of developer. It is really not so tedious as all, you just need to have space for the bottles, and the developer lasts indefinitely.

    Sandy

    To clairfy, I keep one large bottle of fresh sodium citrate, with no potassium dichromate, and from this I replenish the other bottles as needed. For example, if I make an 8X10 print with the developer that has 1ml of the 4% potassium dichromate solution, I replenish the develper with 100ml of the fresh sodium citrate solution, and then add 2 drops (where 20 drops = one ml) of the 4% potassium dichromate solution. If I make a print of the same size with the developer that contains 4ml of the 4% potassium dichromate solution per liter, then I replenish adding 100 ml of fresh sodium citrate solution, to which I then add 8 drops of the 4% potassium dichroamte solution.

    This replenishment system may sound complicated but in fact once you start using it to make print you will find that is really quite simple. pie.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    What is bibulous paper? And is it easy to recognize?

    Sandy
    I apologize: bibulous: 2. absorbent; spongy.

  7. #27
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    Sandy, when you say "the developer lasts indefinitely," are you referring to that used for Pt/Pd or Kallitype or both? My experience is that my Platinum developer lasts indefinitely (all I have to do is add some to recover volume lost over time), but my kallitype developer becomes so silver-saturated that it leaves a nasty stain I find impossible to clear (at least with Cranes Platinotype). Do you have a method to combat that problem?

    And not to put too fine a point on it, but sodium citrate will develop some nasty mold if you let it sit, so "indefinitely" is definitely a relative term.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjarvis
    Sandy, when you say "the developer lasts indefinitely," are you referring to that used for Pt/Pd or Kallitype or both? My experience is that my Platinum developer lasts indefinitely (all I have to do is add some to recover volume lost over time), but my kallitype developer becomes so silver-saturated that it leaves a nasty stain I find impossible to clear (at least with Cranes Platinotype). Do you have a method to combat that problem?

    And not to put too fine a point on it, but sodium citrate will develop some nasty mold if you let it sit, so "indefinitely" is definitely a relative term.
    If you replenish the used developer with an adequate amount of fresh developer you will not get stain. I find that replenishment at about the rate of 100 ml of solution per one print of about 8X10 size through the developer is sufficient to achieve this. However, the actual amount may vary with the actual paper in use so if replenishment at the rate of 100 ml per 8X10 does not prevent staiing, then double or triple the amount. And and once the deveoper gets so saturated tht it stains stain I would suggest replacing about 50% of it.

    Another way of working is to simply always use fresh solution, using the mininum amout of developer needed to develop a printing without staining. I estimate this to be about 100ml for an 8X10 print. However, because of the small quantitiy of developer involvbed you probably need a flat bottom tray for this type of development.

    Sandy

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    Why use potassium dichromate at all if you are attempting to build a negative with a DR to match the process?
    Don.

    Using 1ml dichromate per liter for the print, it takes 18 minutes to develop a N negative in WD2D. Using 4ml it takes 12.5 minutes. I don't think I could do a N+ negative with no dichromate or the 1ml per liter stock. Using 5% dichromate: the difference from 1ml to 4ml is significant.

    Standardizing on the 4ml dichromate per liter developer stock, I can proof with AZO, if I flash the print and use a water bath.

    phil

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by philsweeney
    Don.

    Using 1ml dichromate per liter for the print, it takes 18 minutes to develop a N negative in WD2D. Using 4ml it takes 12.5 minutes. I don't think I could do a N+ negative with no dichromate or the 1ml per liter stock. Using 5% dichromate: the difference from 1ml to 4ml is significant.

    Standardizing on the 4ml dichromate per liter developer stock, I can proof with AZO, if I flash the print and use a water bath.

    phil
    Hi Phil,

    What film are you working with and how are you processing it? I have no problem getting enough negative contrast using HP5+ or TMAX 400 and PyroCat-HD with non dichromated sodium citrate. Looking at my paper curves of toned kallitypes I'm seeing an ES of about 1.28 (I still have a few curves with other toners to plot.). I've not tried to proof with AZO so I'm not sure what advantage that you gain there.

    Don

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