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  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    David, most X-ray products are...for ease of handling by the techs under red safe lights.

    vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12
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    I've asked about x ray materials when getting x-rayed, and a technician once gave me some which I never got around to using. I recall, though, that she said that x ray materials are coated with emulsion on both sides. I don't know whether this is generally true, or just true of the materials they were using. However, if they are coated both sides, forget about critical sharpness.

  3. #13
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    There are some one-sided x-ray films...they have notches, whereas the two sided do not. And you seem to be correct about the sharpness of the two-sided, but it is not too bad. It will depend on the printing process. Simple contract prints onto silver gelatin paper were fine, as are platinum prints. A loss of sharpness seems to be there with carbon prints, but I need to try it again with a different negative to be sure.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    However, if they are coated both sides, forget about critical sharpness.
    Common, inexpensive X-ray film is coated on both sides with emulsion. Theoretically this would limit resolution, as the image from a camera would only be focused on the one side, but in practice, the X-ray images are plenty sharp. If you normally shoot your images with your lens stopped down a couple of stops, the depth-of-field of the lens would compensate and would render both sides "in-focus". Otherwise the very-very slight out-of-focus of the back side of the film can be used as a creative tool, just like the blue, and or blue-green sensitivity of the films is used as a creative tool.

  5. #15

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    Use your regular bw film in what ever camera format you have. Then enlarge the negative on to x-ray duplicating film, ie Kodak dental x-ray duplicating film (8x10) with Kodak GBX chemistry. Other brands may be available in different sizes. The Kodak film is sharp as a tack, very slow and rather expensive but yields great results. remember that it is a reversal film so you do the opposite burning to lighten and dodging to darken the film - so when you print you get the reverse. You must use a red safelight. I use it for platinum/palladium contact printing.
    Jeff

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by wclavey View Post
    I absolutely agree! My point was that it didn't need to cost to experiment and to encourage people to try it! The only cost is their time. And the people here can even short-cut that by giving you their experiences as a starting point. Gene was EXTREMELY helpful to me a year ago or so on it. I can certainly share my learning, if anyone wanted it...

    I did my original exploration & experimentation on blue sensitive high spped film, but based on what I have read here and over on LFPF, I have switched to medium speed green sensitive... bought a new box of that ...so I'm starting over.

    Interesting idea about using X-ray film and just what I needed; there's got to be plenty of it running about over here. Thanks!

    It seems that "why don't you just try it", "what about 6x6cm instead" and "there was a good thread about this..." are important stock answers that need to be intoned frequently. "Just try it" has gotten me off my duff once or twice even though I wasn't the intended recipient.

    One thing that I'd like to see more in general is the "here's the results" follow-ups to interesting threads like this.
    What's new? Has it worked the way you wanted??
    The Kiev 88: Mamiya's key to success in Ukraine.

    Photography without film is like Macroeconomics without reading goat entrails, and look at the mess that got us into.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim_in_Kyiv View Post
    Interesting idea about using X-ray film and just what I needed; there's got to be plenty of it running about over here. Thanks!

    It seems that "why don't you just try it", "what about 6x6cm instead" and "there was a good thread about this..." are important stock answers that need to be intoned frequently. "Just try it" has gotten me off my duff once or twice even though I wasn't the intended recipient.

    One thing that I'd like to see more in general is the "here's the results" follow-ups to interesting threads like this.
    What's new? Has it worked the way you wanted??
    Jim, I can relate to your comment about 'follow up'. I will do my best. As of the present moment: I have just purchase some Fujifilm MI-Dup 12x20 off of Ebay. I hope to use dilute HC-110 for developer, as this is what I have been using for my APHS lith negs. The GBX developer sounds interesting, does anyone know what it might be similar too?
    I will keep the thread informed of my developments.

    -david

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    . . . The double emulsion built up density quite quickly and left me with harsh prints. Of course, if that's what your looking for...
    fyi, Yesterday while experimenting with Kodak MXB and MXG films, both of which have emulsion on both sides, I noticed you can easily remove the emulsion from either side of the film using a soft brush and common laundry bleach (ie; Clorox bleach).The process is almost immediate and does not appear to harm the base material. It's an incredible transformation of the film's capability, I must admit.

    When using the film in a camera I would suggest noting which side of the film was facing the lens prior to reducing a specific side.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  9. #19
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    Did you remove the emulsion after the film was already expose, or developed?
    f/22 and be there.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Did you remove the emulsion after the film was already expose, or developed?
    I think I have perfected the process today.

    Expose, develope and wash your x-ray film as normal. Once the film has thoroughly dried, place the film on a clean sheet of glass with your favorite side facing the glass. I am using a sheet of glass that is 14x18 for a film that is 8x10. Tape the film to the glass along the edges with 3M Scotch Safe Release Painters' Tape. Seal all edges of the film completely to insure no liquids can pass to the emulsion beneath. Use plenty of thumb pressure on the tape to insure a good tight seal. I double tape the corners, also. Using a soft 2" paint brush apply Clorox bleach to the surface of the film. Apply the bleach to the entire surface of the film in a brisk circular fashion. Continue this operation for about 15-30 seconds for the entire surface of the film. Wash the bleach off with water to see the results. Remove the tape and rewash the film.

    If anyone would like to add their own experience here, please do.
    Last edited by DannL; 06-07-2009 at 07:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

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