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  1. #1
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Daguerreotype on glass plates?

    So for some reason this came as news to me. I understood that the process needed to be done on a silver surface. Now in a couple of references I have seen the statements of Daguerreotypes being done on glass. I understand that the image is fragile and would be quite typical to lay a piece of glass over the top to protect the image.

    Is this factual? Have Daguerreotypes been done on glass?

    Thank you.
    Robert Hall
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  2. #2
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  3. #3
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I thought that the "magic" of the daguerreotype was produced by the mirror it was supported by. Without that it would just be a glass plate with an image on it.

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    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    I thought that the "magic" of the daguerreotype was produced by the mirror it was supported by. Without that it would just be a glass plate with an image on it.
    Dags were originally done on metal plates that were silver plated, sensitised by iodine fumes. No reason this couldn't be done on a silver mirror that did not have the usual laquer coating normally applied to protect it from tarnishing.
    What you may be thinking about is another process called ambrotype, a collodian emulsion positive process that has a black backing to make the silver image look lighter by comparison.
    Gary Beasley

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    just to add onto what gary already said ...

    people often mistaken ambrotypes for dags.
    they are both found in cases that tend to look the same ...
    it is tilting the image and seeing the negative as well as the positive
    that is the dead give away ...
    some of the early ambrotypes had a 2nd glass plate that was put
    ontop of the glass image to "seal it" / protect it (in the case ) ...
    as you mentioned ...

    this site has a little info on both ..

  6. #6
    JG Motamedi's Avatar
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    Daguerreotypes can be be made on silvered (mirrored) glass, or any pure silver surface. The problem with silvered glass is that it is incredibly fragile, and tends to flake off in the fixer or gilding. Attached is a example of what happens.

    (Attached: Traditional mercury developed whole plate Daguerreotype on silvered glass)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PeelingDag.jpg  

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    Still pretty awesome!

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    Hi All,
    This thread caught my eye because I am interested in all types of images on glass. Abot 10 years ago I posed this same question to a lady chemist who's husband was a Daguerreotype maker. She thought that,in order to get enough silver on the glass to make a real Daguerreotype,the piece of glass would become opaque. This would defeat the purpose of using glass instead of the traditional copper.
    I have never made a real Daguerreotype, only the so called "Modern Daggerriotype" which dose not use mercury for developing and looks pale beside The Real Thing. But I would tend to agree with the Lady Chemist, who's name escapes me.
    Bill

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    thanks jason

    that is beautiful!!

    john

  10. #10
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JG Motamedi View Post
    Daguerreotypes can be be made on silvered (mirrored) glass, or any pure silver surface. The problem with silvered glass is that it is incredibly fragile, and tends to flake off in the fixer or gilding. Attached is a example of what happens.

    (Attached: Traditional mercury developed whole plate Daguerreotype on silvered glass)
    I think thats why a clear laquer is applied over the image to protect it. I suspect also the silver was peeling because it was applied to the glass poorly. Maybe the glass can be etched prior to the chemical deposition process to give it some tooth for the silver to adhere to, since it will not be used as a mirror from the glass side anyway.
    Gary Beasley

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