Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,963   Posts: 1,523,230   Online: 843
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 33 of 33
  1. #31
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,858
    Images
    9
    The dichromate bleach removes the silver and tans (hardens) the gelatine proportionally. Ferri only removes the silver, as far as I know.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  2. #32
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    The dichromate bleach removes the silver and tans (hardens) the gelatine proportionally. Ferri only removes the silver, as far as I know.
    Ok, that would indicate a ferri bleach might be unusable in bromoil printing, and thus also why there are almost no references on the net, as the tanning seems to be a vital process in the creation of the "matrix".

    Anyway, I am not afraid of a bit of experimenting, so I might just give it a try using the ferri based bleach I have and see what happens on a test sheet.

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  3. #33
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Another question that came up after reading several articles about bromoil on the internet:

    I see that all articles mention a drying stage of the paper after bleaching and washing / clearing the print of the bleach. Now on the other hand, the paper needs to be re-wetted before inking, with some articles mentioning a prolonged soak of up to 20 minutes before inking.

    What is the use of drying the paper, if it will be re-soaked in water for such long times before inking? Surely, even with a few minutes, the paper and gelatine will be almost fully saturated with water, so why not continue with inking directly after bleaching and washing?

    Or is the drying process done to facilitate the hardening / tanning process of the matrix, so as to have a more robust matrix better able to withstand the subsequent inking process?
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin