Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,462   Posts: 1,570,644   Online: 827
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Ian Leake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,368
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Have to agree that copying with a Digital camera is possibly the best option, but studio flash is a far better & more controllable light source than daylight.
    Studio flash is certainly much more consistent and controllable than natural light, but artificial light also warms up the print considerably which then requires more extreme Photoshop tweaks to get back to a 'close-to-print' copy. This, of course, assumes that you consider the print in daylight to be the true warmth as opposed to the print under tungsten (I do but that's just an opinion).

    One thing I forgot to add in my earlier post, is that it's vital to shoot in raw mode on your camera. I use a QPcard to enable me to white balance the picture in ACR before doing anything in Photoshop. I've seen some really strange effects when the camera is doing its own white balancing. If you've only got a jpeg then you're stuck with whatever the camera thinks is best...

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,391
    Images
    148
    Studio flash is quite different in colour temperature to artificial light, it should give very accurate colour balance if the camera is set correctly.

    Ian

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    27
    David. V700 comes with silverfast programe, isn't it?
    u should scan with RGB and turn it to grayscale and working on that. i think it's films problem.

  4. #14
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Scanned paper grain is a thorn in my side. I very much like matte papers and it's always tough for me to get good flatbed scans of prints. I have tried re-photographing prints digitally and can't say I like the results much more- the subtle colour matching is pretty hard. I did experiment with scanning wet prints and that can work but... what a mess!

    Guess I need to set up a proper copy stand.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Holland and Brazil
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,066
    There might be an easier way.

    Sorry, but I downloaded the first pic and ran it through Noise Ninja and it realy cleared up.
    Noise Ninja can be used in PhotoShop, but you have to pay for it, about $ 50,- if I remember correctly.

    I can send you the file by email if you want to.

    Peter

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    65
    The texture of the paper will most certainly factor in this looking grainy, using dICE will only DESTROY the image you're trying to make as it does not handle b&w well at all (makes windows disappear and such).

    Lovely work though!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin