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  1. #1

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    Sep 2003
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    still trying to improve my kallitypes. working on one possible problem at at time. the humidity in my darkroom was low so I got a humidifier. running on high for appx 10 hours its up to about 50% from 35%. I have also hung some papers so they can acclimate to that humidity. Curious what others do? Can I just run the humidifier a couple of days in advance of printing? I usually do all my kallitype printing on the weekends. for the most part it seems my papers are sucking up the coatings and I am using papers others have had good results with. If I try any sizing, the arrowroot starch sounds easy whereas the gelatin methods are more elaborate and scary! I have already tried a little PVA under the drier conditions with minor improvement. BTW I am experimenting with negatives that require 4ml of dichromate to 1 liter of sodium citrate, so I believe neg range is not a big issue although I intend to increase the neg range in a few for further prints.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    25
    For Pt/Pd printing (I have not tried Kallitype), I have one small humidifier and one 'room' size humidifier. I fill the sink with warm water, turn both humidifiers on, turn a small fan on and go have coffee. The darkroom, 6x12 foot, goes from 28% to 50% in about an hour. When I was printing ziatypes (which need a lot of humidity), I would turn on the shower in the bathroom for about 20 minutes so the room was good and steamy, hang the paper and let it be for around 20-30 minutes. Do you have a large room? 10 hours is a long time!

  3. #3

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    Sep 2002
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    Phil, perhaps you would get better results using potassium oxalate as the developer if you are using the restrainer in the developer.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    178
    thanks, for the help

    lallan, yes my darkroom is fairly large. I did print this weekend with better results. I can tell my paper is not sucking up the coating as fast, since I put the humidifier in the room.

    jorge, I am using dichromate. I thought about p.o. But I thought that might only change the image color?

  5. #5

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    Phil, on the technical side, PO will give greater printing speed. On the personal side, I developed both pt/pd and Kallitypes in both PO and ammonim citrate and found that the PO developed prints had better "depth" and a smoother tonality.

    I then proceeded to try and mix PO and ammonium citrate in different ratios to see if I could gain the speed and depth of PO and the cooler tones of the citrate and found that there was no in between, the prints with one or the other developer were better than those with the mix.

    IMO this is specially true with Cranes platinotype, the prints made with this paper and developed with citrate were rather weak and drab.....nothing like the prints I am getting with PO and socorro paper.

    As I told you, alt printing is very "personal", Arentz gets glowing prints with platinotype, I just cant no matter what I do.....

  6. #6

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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Phil, on the technical side, PO will give greater printing speed. On the personal side, I developed both pt/pd and Kallitypes in both PO and ammonim citrate and found that the PO developed prints had better "depth" and a smoother tonality.

    As I told you, alt printing is very "personal", Arentz gets glowing prints with platinotype, I just cant no matter what I do.....
    To further emphasize Jorge's point that alt printing is very personal, I get the same depth and tonality with sodium citrate as with potassium oxalate. Potassium oxalate at a given percentage (20-25%) has more capacity before it requires replenishing, and it is easier to decant since the development byproducts settle to the bottom. On the other hand, sodium citrate is a lot less expensive so it costs less to replenish, and less in the long run.



    Sandy

  7. #7

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    Sep 2003
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    178
    thanks Sandy and Jorge, I did notice the p.o. is more expensive. So far I have used the sodium citrate. I put a larger humidifier in the room so I can get the humidity up to 60%. I would like to try to cut the clearing time a little. Using the 3% citric acid solution I have been clearing for 4 minutes. I have not had any stain on the unexposed coating so I thought I would try reducing to 3 minutes. How will I know when the clearing time is inadequate?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by philsweeney
    thanks Sandy and Jorge, I did notice the p.o. is more expensive. So far I have used the sodium citrate. I put a larger humidifier in the room so I can get the humidity up to 60%. I would like to try to cut the clearing time a little. Using the 3% citric acid solution I have been clearing for 4 minutes. I have not had any stain on the unexposed coating so I thought I would try reducing to 3 minutes. How will I know when the clearing time is inadequate?

    Adequate clearing will be indicated by the fact that there is absolutely no stain left in the areas of the paper that were sensitized but that received no exposure. If there is any stain at all your clearing was inadequate. Fogging could also cause stain but assuming that you are drying your sensitized paper in the dark, or in very low light, this should not be a problem.

    For a more methodical approach see the section on how to verify clearing at Jeffrey Mathiias' site. H

    Sandy King

  9. #9

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    Sep 2002
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    Phil,

    I haven't priced either chemical recently, but it is a simple matter to make PO from oxalic acid, potassium hydroxide, and H2O. Both of the components can be had fairly cheaply on their own.

    For example, check out:

    http://chemistrystore.com/

    for prices of the composite chemicals.

    I mix my own in several gallon batches every so often. It is much cheaper through that route. Last time I ordered, I got about 25# of each chemical. I also use the oxalic for other things, so it was not really an issue to have it on hand.


    ---Michael

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    178
    Michael: thanks, would you post the recipe for mixing these to make the PO?

    Sandy, I read the article on clearing, but the second part totally lost me! Can you help me with the second part of the clearing test? It seems there are some steps missing that are implicit for the more experienced. My current processing is: 8 minutes development and there already is no stain on the unexposed coating. So I wanted to figure the shortest clearing time to reduce the bleaching in the citric acid.

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