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  1. #1

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    Thinking about Hake brushes.......

    Hi All,

    I spent the last couple of days thinking about and looking over a large variety of Hake brush, trying to determine what the best for alt work might be. A visit to my local Japanese Caligraphy store (being in Japan makes this easy) and spent several hours going over brushes.

    A long talk with the owner came up a variety of brushes. They range from the super cheap synthetic brush to the ultra expensive human hair brush.

    This isnt a big store and he had in stock,

    Synthetic brush
    Camel Hair
    Goat Hair
    Wool (Sheep)
    Pig Hair
    Cat Hair
    Human Hair
    And a few others I cant recall.

    The human, cat and pig hair brushes were the most expensive a 4 inch brush was in the 130USD range which are handmade. The others were quite a bit cheaper, wit the synthetic brush only costing 5 bucks.

    I havent had a chance to look into the actual properties of the various types of hair yet, but thats next.

    Anybody have any thoughts about the best type of hake?

    Gary
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for hours.
    Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

    Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc.

  2. #2
    Akki14's Avatar
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    I'm not sure which would be best but the hake brushes normally found in art stores in the UK are goat hair. Make sure you look at how they're made, I'm sure some of the hake brushes available here are actually just very bad pastry brushes where the hairs fall out and ruin your coating.
    Also if you're going for a more expensive process, try to get one with short hairs so there's less brush to soak up your expensive sensitiser, otherwise you can trim the bristles back a little after you buy it so they're shorter.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Buy the softest one, preferably hand sewn. The softness wlil enable the brush to get the sensitizer into the texture better.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Scott D has an article at CiM that gives recommendations for Hake Brushes for use with Pl/Pd printing. Might be of some use.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #5
    timbo10ca's Avatar
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    I'm told that the best way to go is actually a Richeson brush (synthetic), and avoid the Hake
    If only we could pull out our brains and use only our eyes. P. Picasso

    http://www.timbowlesphotography.com

  6. #6
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    In my experience with a Hake brush is that it soaked up a lot of sensitizer. I went with a synthetic sable water color wash brush that allows me to use much less.
    Dennis

  7. #7

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    Hi Gary.

    Which store did you visit?
    I made the "rounds" a number of years ago as well.
    It should be interesting to see what you learn about the different hair types and how that relates to what you will be using it for.

    Curious, Did you mean the round caligraphy brushes, or the flat "hake" brushes?

    It depends on what chemistry you use and what sort of images you make...
    I do know some soak up too much expensive metals and I think synthetics are preferred for economy.

    I think there was a very nice program on brushes on NHK's "Bi no Tsubo"
    「美の壺」


    Quote Originally Posted by coriana6jp View Post
    Hi All,

    I spent the last couple of days thinking about and looking over a large variety of Hake brush, trying to determine what the best for alt work might be. A visit to my local Japanese Caligraphy store (being in Japan makes this easy) and spent several hours going over brushes.

    A long talk with the owner came up a variety of brushes. They range from the super cheap synthetic brush to the ultra expensive human hair brush.

    This isnt a big store and he had in stock,

    Synthetic brush
    Camel Hair
    Goat Hair
    Wool (Sheep)
    Pig Hair
    Cat Hair
    Human Hair
    And a few others I cant recall.

    The human, cat and pig hair brushes were the most expensive a 4 inch brush was in the 130USD range which are handmade. The others were quite a bit cheaper, wit the synthetic brush only costing 5 bucks.

    I havent had a chance to look into the actual properties of the various types of hair yet, but thats next.

    Anybody have any thoughts about the best type of hake?

    Gary
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 06-29-2009 at 01:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8

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    Hi All

    Thanks for the comments. Honestly, I wanted a Richeson brush, but they are hard to find here and very expensive when you do about double the cost of US. At somepoint I might breakdown and get one, but for now Hake are much more readily availible for me.

    All the brushes I used,as well as looked at recently were all the traditional hake brushes, with no metal and hand sewn. The main difference is the type of hair and the size is what determines the price. Considering the high cost of some of those brushes, buying a bunch a playing around is not going to happen if it does the wife will put the hake somewhere I dont care for them to go.....if you get the meaning.

    Ray, I went to my local calligraphy shop here in town they sell the regular calligraphy brushes and specialized hake as well. For calligraphy they actually had a couple of small brushes made from Human baby hair, which shocked me. They were priced out of sight though. NHK Bi no Tsubo isnt shown anymore as far as I know.

    Thanks for the feedback, I will do a little more research in the hair types and report back when time permits.

    Thanks all.

    Gary
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for hours.
    Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

    Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc.

  9. #9
    nsurit's Avatar
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    What is the cost of Hake brush hairs stuck in yoiur print and not discovered until after the exposure? I don't know, however I used a Richardson this past week and think my Hakes will face an early retirement. Perhaps a downsizing would be a more appropriate term. jerrysartarama.com is a "getting place" Bill Barber

  10. #10

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    So far, I have never found brush hairs in any of my prints. But, the first thing I did to the brush was a bead of super glue to the area where the bristles meet the handle. No more hair, except those falling from my slowing growing baldspot.

    My other concern is the Richeson brush has metal in the handle & I am not sure thats a good idea with kallitypes. Some people have said avoid metal in the brushes at all cost, so it gives me a reason to pause.

    Thanks.

    Gary
    Build a man a fire and he will be warm for hours.
    Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

    Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc.

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