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  1. #1

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    Dageurreuxtype with Rolleiflex?

    I am interested in making Dageurreuxtype, so am starting to gather the nesscessary chemicals, frames, silver sheets etc...

    It is intended to be a long term project, so will probably take me a few years before I have the first results.

    I have a rolleiflex with Plate back, has anyone had any success in using the rollei in producing dags? Am I completely barking up the wrong tree?

  2. #2

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    My main question would be: fits the plate you intend to use (thickness) into the holder.

    The other thing I can think of is that the Rolleiflex gives you very sharp pic's, not like the ones in the early day's of photography, so you will need a softar filter-lens.
    Otherwise is the Rolleiflex just a camera with a lens and a shutter, so give it a try !

    Peter

  3. #3
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    The plate holder for the Rollei can be used either for film or glass plates. If you can use glassplates in a holder, it is possible to make Daguerreotypes. The dags would be very small and gemlike. A first try might be to make paper negatives with the plate holder to get a bit further along the way towards the real thing, while picking up the skills and material. Another would be to use glassplates with liquid emulsion.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  4. #4

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    I can vouch for the effectiveness of using liquid emulsion on glass and using it in-camera. Rocklamd's liquid light works well, but their tintype emulsion works even better.

  5. #5

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    Two things.
    1) Many dags were very sharp and you don't need to soften them.
    2) Most were also on the small side, Large was the exception.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  6. #6

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    Proposed roadmap?

    Thanks for all the input, it is getting a bit more encouraging.

    I have been wanting to do dags for a while now, to me it embodies everything that is precious in analog photography. A photograph that is jewel like. I even took out a very technical book from the library to find out more from the process.

    What would you proposed to be a sensible "roadmap" of skills I should acquire before I expose my first polished and fumed silverplate? Shall I attempt tintype, wet collidal or ambrotype first? Wet emulsion? Toning? Case making skills?

    I have time so I can take slowly, I am hoping for a first attempt in 5 years or so. I have university level engineering and chemistry skills. I also worked in film based printing factory prepress and photomicrography professionally so hopefully I have the basics already.

    The main thing is having a safe and isolated place to do the work, and that would probably come with time.

  7. #7
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I think John Barniers book Coming into Focus will provide you with some more ideas concerning dags and other early processes.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  8. #8

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    An interesting idea...

  9. #9
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamster View Post
    What would you proposed to be a sensible "roadmap" of skills I should acquire before I expose my first polished and fumed silverplate? Shall I attempt tintype, wet collidal or ambrotype first? Wet emulsion? Toning? Case making skills?

    I have time so I can take slowly, I am hoping for a first attempt in 5 years or so. I have university level engineering and chemistry skills. I also worked in film based printing factory prepress and photomicrography professionally so hopefully I have the basics already.
    It's a bit off-topic, but since you show interest in Daguerreotype and other historical processes, you may find this document worth reading:

    "PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE 19th CENTURY: A process identification guide" by William E.Leyshon

    There is a section about Daguerreotype as well. Although this book does not cover the actual making of historical process type photos, it does give lots of interesting (technical) info, for example, there are even some electron-microscopic images of a Daguerreotype. Since you have a technical background, it should be an interesting read.

    I put a link up to the freely downloadable PDF (from a university website) version of this book in the Books section of the APUG Web Links Portal here:

    http://www.apug.org/portal/?id_category=93

    Scroll down to see it listed.

    Marco
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    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  10. #10
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    Hi,

    If you really want to make Daguerreotype, I would simply start with Daguerreotype. They are quite different from the rest of the processes that you will not gain much.

    There are few key points in making Daguerreotype as far as I understand:

    1) Quality of plating
    2) Polishing
    3) Getting chemistry (especially Bromine)

    We invited Takashi Arai for a demonstration this year, and I saw his entire process. Theses are key points in making successful plates and the most difficult parts to me. It is not easy to create the first acceptable plate but I am sure you will feel good if you make one.

    We are running a daguerreotype workshop with him this fall. It would be a great occasion to learn from someone who is doing it already.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi

    Quote Originally Posted by Hamster View Post
    What would you proposed to be a sensible "roadmap" of skills I should acquire before I expose my first polished and fumed silverplate? Shall I attempt tintype, wet collidal or ambrotype first? Wet emulsion? Toning? Case making skills?
    ----- P R O J E C T B A S H O -----
    Re-introducing Photography to Philadelphia
    Summer '11 Photography Workshops

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