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  1. #11
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    Ka,

    For my Hassey, I have bought and used respooled Kodak Aerial 2524 IR film from www.davidromano.com. It's the same emulsion as Kodak HIE and works great.

    Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    ... Just remember that the Finepix may have an IR blocking filter in it and you are using the residual sensitivity through that for a very low EI. ...
    Thanks, you're right! The sun is shining so I checked with daylight, and the 87 filter requires about 10 stops more exposure. I'll check the extra exposure needed with my studio and 'camera' flashguns next time i set them up. (I've got some ND filters I can use to reduce the non-IR exposure with)

  3. #13

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    I want to try some Kodak HIE, however, what speed should i rate the film at, and what is a recommended development time with D-76?

  4. #14

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    There's a lot of information on infrared film at http://www.cocam.co.uk/CoCamWS/Infrared/INFRARED.HTM including exposure guidelines with different filters and development times.

  5. #15
    Ka
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    Mike - What an excellent source of Infrared Information. Thank you very muchly!
    ka

  6. #16
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    Theres also this:
    http://www.a1.nl/phomepag/markerink/mainpage.htm
    and you can subscribe to the Infrared Digest by sending an email the the subject line SUBSCRIBE INFRARED to MAJORDOMO@A1.NL
    The webpage also has links and information on ultraviolet photography.

  7. #17
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    I thought that Konica was just as sensitive to the visible spectrum as the Maco 820 and Ilford SFX films.

    I have found that the Maco 820 film works best with either the 88A or 87 filters; anything less and you won't see the IR effect. Ilford SFX gives a good IR effect with an 89B/R72 filter.

    I've never heard of an anti-curl layer on the Maco films. I know there's an anti-halation layer on the 820c Precision film. How warm was your water?

    Diane

    Quote Originally Posted by AllanD
    You will have a problem problem with any IR film that retains significant visible light sensitivity when used with a red filter. This includes Maco 820 and Ilford SFX, but not (I think) the Konica film. There may be some IR effect, but there will be significant density due to the visible light (i.e. they wont have the effect you are looking for )

    I tried one roll (!) of Maco 820 (in 120 format) using a red filter and the results were disappointing, with, to me, no IR effect whatsoever. I guess that a proper IR filter is required with this film. The film is fine grained. The EI is a notional 100, although Maco don't tell you this ! I never worked out a personal EI; I just derated according to the filter factor.

    BTW, I made the mistake of washing the Maco film in water that was slightly too warm, resulting in the anti-curl coating dissolving. This made a right old mess. I have never had this problem with any other film.

    I have used a fair amount of Ilford SFX in 120 format with their SFX filter. This produces a quite surprising amount of "IR effect" on a sunny day and is what you might call "medium grained", with no halation. The fact that you can't see throughout the SFX filter is a serious impediment to wedding photography! But you need the filter to get the IR effect. The notional EI of SFX is 200, one stop faster than Maco 820, giving you more margin for hand held. It half the price as well, so you can feel less bad when it all goes wrong.

    In theory, flash photography is a rich source of IR. What the proportion of the output is in the IR region (and hence, what "look" you get) depends on the flash unit. I guess the thing to do is put an true IR filter over the head a powerful flashgun (strobe) and start experimenting.

  8. #18

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    HIE in 120 format.

    http://www.davidromano.com/
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  9. #19

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    A good friend of mine was kind enough to give me a book called: “Infra-Red Photography, A Complete Workshop Guide.” It was written by Hugh Milsom and covers exposure, development, filters (including yellow and orange) and how they perform. The only drawback is that Maco was just releasing their IR film and there is not too much info on it. I’ve found it extremely useful; it’s chocked full of incredible images and a bunch of Portfolios.

    The ISBN# is 0 86343 373 1 Fountain Press, 2001. There may be an updated version.

    Happy Days
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  10. #20
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanD
    You will have a problem problem with any IR film that retains significant visible light sensitivity when used with a red filter. This includes Maco 820 and Ilford SFX, but not (I think) the Konica film. There may be some IR effect, but there will be significant density due to the visible light (i.e. they wont have the effect you are looking for )

    I tried one roll (!) of Maco 820 (in 120 format) using a red filter and the results were disappointing, with, to me, no IR effect whatsoever. I guess that a proper IR filter is required with this film. The film is fine grained. The EI is a notional 100, although Maco don't tell you this ! I never worked out a personal EI; I just derated according to the filter factor.

    BTW, I made the mistake of washing the Maco film in water that was slightly too warm, resulting in the anti-curl coating dissolving. This made a right old mess. I have never had this problem with any other film.

    I have used a fair amount of Ilford SFX in 120 format with their SFX filter. This produces a quite surprising amount of "IR effect" on a sunny day and is what you might call "medium grained", with no halation. The fact that you can't see throughout the SFX filter is a serious impediment to wedding photography! But you need the filter to get the IR effect. The notional EI of SFX is 200, one stop faster than Maco 820, giving you more margin for hand held. It half the price as well, so you can feel less bad when it all goes wrong.

    In theory, flash photography is a rich source of IR. What the proportion of the output is in the IR region (and hence, what "look" you get) depends on the flash unit. I guess the thing to do is put an true IR filter over the head a powerful flashgun (strobe) and start experimenting.

    I never am able to get much in the way of an IR effect with a red filter and Konica film. I'll be glad when all of my supply is gone!

    The Maco film, when washed, should have a blue/blue-green color to the water when you pour it out of your tank. This is normal for this film.

    The MACO 820c films (there are two, one is just 820c & the other is 820c AURA) work best (i.e. get the best IR effect) with either an 88A or an 87 filter. I'm glad that these films are available in 4x5 & 8x10 sizes.
    Diane

    Halak 41

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