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  1. #1
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Infrared filter (not completely dark)

    Good afternoon gentlemen.

    I have recently bought an IR film (the Efke one) to give it a try before this product disappears. My intention is not to get "special effects" but to penetrate the fog of distant landscapes.

    I understand that a dark red filter is not enough to actually have a proper IR anti-fog effect. However, I fear that a full IR filter would be too dark to be used with a reflex camera.

    What type/number of filter can I use to get a good anti-fog effect, with still enough vision left in the finder to be able to frame and focus the image correctly?
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
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  2. #2

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    Maybe a Wratten #72 (extremely deep red)... actually an IR filter that passes near IR. There's also a #29 (very deep red). If I was attempting your goal I would try the #29.

    EDIT above... typed #29 twice but the near IR should have been a 72!!
    Last edited by Mike1234; 08-28-2009 at 11:43 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Yes, a deep red filter might do it for you. But honestly you won't get as much haze clearing effect as you would with something much deeper like an rm72 or #87. But instead of composing through the filter, why not just compose (using a tripod) and then put the filter on.

    Overall, the obstacle of composing through a filter is why I prefer rangefinders for IR.
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  4. #4
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    You will probably need at least the 72 filter mentioned by Mike above. A tripod is usually recommended when shooting IR because of the longer exposure times that these filters cause. Also, it allows you to remove the filter without losing your composition.
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  5. #5
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Yes, a deep red filter might do it for you. But honestly you won't get as much haze clearing effect as you would with something much deeper like an rm72 or #87. But instead of composing through the filter, why not just compose (using a tripod) and then put the filter on.

    Overall, the obstacle of composing through a filter is why I prefer rangefinders for IR.
    One of the clear examples of an advantage over slrs.

    I have used rangefinders. I have one. I usually use slrs.

    Steve
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  6. #6
    DaveOttawa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    ...But instead of composing through the filter, why not just compose (using a tripod) and then put the filter on.
    This is the way to go, Efke IR is a very slow film so you are almost certainly going to be shooting on a tripod if you want a sharp negative anyway.
    Then you can use whichever filter you want including the 89B opaque (almost) ones.

  7. #7
    Mike Richards's Avatar
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    B+W Filters

    Marco,
    Since you are in Europe, the German B+W filters might be easier to come by. The opaque 093 is best, but you can get some acceptable results with the 092 deep red. I agree with the comments about using a tripod; 093 and tripod will provide the sharpest images.
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  8. #8
    Mike Richards's Avatar
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    PS if you are really interested in sharpness, you will want the Efke IR with anti-halation layer. I assume it's like the old Maco 820c. The layer washes off in a minute with water before developing, but is difficult to load on plastic reels from the outside in. I always used steel reels, so no problem.
    Mike Richards' Mobile Me gallery, including the Holocaust and Turkey Expo.

  9. #9
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti View Post
    Good afternoon gentlemen.

    I have recently bought an IR film (the Efke one) to give it a try before this product disappears. My intention is not to get "special effects" but to penetrate the fog of distant landscapes.

    I understand that a dark red filter is not enough to actually have a proper IR anti-fog effect. However, I fear that a full IR filter would be too dark to be used with a reflex camera.

    What type/number of filter can I use to get a good anti-fog effect, with still enough vision left in the finder to be able to frame and focus the image correctly?
    If you are trying to pierce the fog in the distance for landscapes, you can probably just focus your camera to infinity and not have to worry about framing. However, if your camera does not have an external viewfinder, you may have to take the filter off to compose.

    I wouldn't worry about focus too much.
    www.EASmithV.com

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  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    If the moisture content of the fog is high, which it probably will be, the filter will not matter. Water [and Carbon Dioxide] attenuate infrared light in many wavelengths. It will be interesting to see what you get. Would you post pairs of photographs, one with visible light and one with the infrared when you do this experiment?

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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