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  1. #21

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    Loris, agree with the last bit but not the first, since I've seen several examples of the same Adams image printed(by him) early and late in his career, and the early ones are natural and subtle; the later ones printed with way too much (for my taste) contrast. So it's not the lens, it's how he chose to print the picture. But we're way off topic for alternative process (let alone gum and humidity) now; how did we get here?

  2. #22

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    Gum and Humidity

    Thanks for the compliment Katharine!

    Quote Originally Posted by Katharine Thayer View Post
    P.S. Anyone interested in gum printing, particularly tricolor gum, should have a look at Jon's print "Santa Margarita 1" that's currently on the main page at hybridphoto. That's gum printing:

    http://www.hybridphoto.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=602

  3. #23

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    Basically for cyanotype you need super thick paper (thick like watercolor grade) so it won't warp too much. Fine printmaking paper also is good. I have no idea about gum bichromate.

  4. #24
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janessa View Post
    Basically for cyanotype you need super thick paper (thick like watercolor grade) so it won't warp too much. Fine printmaking paper also is good. I have no idea about gum bichromate.
    This is a very misleading statement. I've successfully printed many cyanotypes on a 32lb rag typing paper. Cyanotype doesn't 'need' a certain thickness of paper, just one that has enough wet strength for processing. (and works well with the process).
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  5. #25
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    This is a very misleading statement. I've successfully printed many cyanotypes on a 32lb rag typing paper. Cyanotype doesn't 'need' a certain thickness of paper, just one that has enough wet strength for processing. (and works well with the process).
    Double ditto what Jeremy said.
    Don Bryant

  6. #26

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    Janessa, I've found that my cyanotype images are stronger (= darker) and punchier (with full highlight detail that is) when printing on thin papers. (Same for other iron processes such as argyrotype, pt/pd...) One good example to such papers is Awagami Masa (weight = something like 80-90 gsm). It's cheap, try and see it for yourself - you absolutely won't regret.

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